Technology and Innovation at International Defense and Security Expo

first_imgThen, Rio de Janeiro Governor Luiz Fernando Pezão addressed the attendees to thank the federal government’s cooperation in the public security sector. “This support is essential for the success of missions like retaking the favelas [shantytowns] previously overtaken by drug trafficking, especially because of the proximity to the Olympic Games.” Defense and security industries are of great importance in the global market and critical drivers of technological advances, particularly for Brazil, where they have grown in recent years and now represent 41.2 percent of military investments in Latin America. LAAD Defense & Security 2015, the largest and most important international defense and security expo in Latin America, boasts over 700 exhibitors from at least 70 countries and extends across three pavilions in Riocentro, Rio de Janeiro, from April 14 to 17. LAAD Defense & Security 2015 has a seminar program that brings together the main national and international industry leaders. Among those who have confirmed their attendance are representatives of the Brazilian Ministry of Defense, of the Armed Forces, and of the Organizing Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games Rio 2016, as well as representatives of the Coordinating Committee of the Combat Aircraft Program (COPAC), and of the Brazilian Peace Operations Training Institute (CCOPAB), in addition to logistics, security, telecommunications, and retail companies. For its part, LAAD’s IV Security Seminar is focusing on three main topics: Public Security, Corporate Security, and Security Integration. Both are being attended by high-ranking security and defense authorities, specialists and professionals. In its 10th edition, LAAD Defense & Security brings together more than 70 delegations to Latin America’s primary defense technology event The event’s visitors will encounter the most modern technology and services in more than 20 sectors of defense and security industries, such as arms and ammunition; authentication, access control and surveillance; construction in defense and security; consulting, training, and services; emergency and rescue; aeronautical engineering; marine engineering; personal equipment; optical and optronics products; criminal and forensic expertise; protection systems; information technology; cyber security; transmission; communication and global positioning; and vehicles. For its part, LAAD’s IV Security Seminar is focusing on three main topics: Public Security, Corporate Security, and Security Integration. Both are being attended by high-ranking security and defense authorities, specialists and professionals. The event’s visitors will encounter the most modern technology and services in more than 20 sectors of defense and security industries, such as arms and ammunition; authentication, access control and surveillance; construction in defense and security; consulting, training, and services; emergency and rescue; aeronautical engineering; marine engineering; personal equipment; optical and optronics products; criminal and forensic expertise; protection systems; information technology; cyber security; transmission; communication and global positioning; and vehicles. During his opening remarks, Brazilian Defense Minister Jaques Wagner said that “even though peace is always expected, it doesn’t mean that we should not invest in weapons or develop the war industry, especially, because investing in the defense industry boils over to the rest of the economy, as a whole.” The 10th edition of the event stands out as one of the main platforms to showcase new technologies, equipment, services, and knowledge focused on these segments, and is also a strategic space for the promotion of business with the armed forces, special and police forces, consulting, corporate security, and government agencies. LAAD Defense & Security 2015, the largest and most important international defense and security expo in Latin America, boasts over 700 exhibitors from at least 70 countries and extends across three pavilions in Riocentro, Rio de Janeiro, from April 14 to 17. LAAD is also recognized for attracting high-level participants. In its 2015 edition, the event will host official delegates, including senior military leaders, general officers, and high-ranking armed forces representatives from Brazil, Latin America, the United States, and other countries. Chiefs, secretaries, commanders, superintendents, and police delegates from several countries, as well as other authorities are also attending. The organization is expecting over 40,000 people to attend the four-day event. LAAD Defense & Security 2015 has a seminar program that brings together the main national and international industry leaders. Among those who have confirmed their attendance are representatives of the Brazilian Ministry of Defense, of the Armed Forces, and of the Organizing Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games Rio 2016, as well as representatives of the Coordinating Committee of the Combat Aircraft Program (COPAC), and of the Brazilian Peace Operations Training Institute (CCOPAB), in addition to logistics, security, telecommunications, and retail companies. LAAD is also recognized for attracting high-level participants. In its 2015 edition, the event will host official delegates, including senior military leaders, general officers, and high-ranking armed forces representatives from Brazil, Latin America, the United States, and other countries. Chiefs, secretaries, commanders, superintendents, and police delegates from several countries, as well as other authorities are also attending. The organization is expecting over 40,000 people to attend the four-day event. In its 10th edition, LAAD Defense & Security brings together more than 70 delegations to Latin America’s primary defense technology event LAAD’s IV Defense Seminar will showcase the strategic projects of the Navy, Army, and Air Force, electronic warfare, the role of developing institutions in the Brazilian defense industry, among others. Seminars Then, Rio de Janeiro Governor Luiz Fernando Pezão addressed the attendees to thank the federal government’s cooperation in the public security sector. “This support is essential for the success of missions like retaking the favelas [shantytowns] previously overtaken by drug trafficking, especially because of the proximity to the Olympic Games.” Defense and security industries are of great importance in the global market and critical drivers of technological advances, particularly for Brazil, where they have grown in recent years and now represent 41.2 percent of military investments in Latin America. Seminars During his opening remarks, Brazilian Defense Minister Jaques Wagner said that “even though peace is always expected, it doesn’t mean that we should not invest in weapons or develop the war industry, especially, because investing in the defense industry boils over to the rest of the economy, as a whole.” LAAD’s IV Defense Seminar will showcase the strategic projects of the Navy, Army, and Air Force, electronic warfare, the role of developing institutions in the Brazilian defense industry, among others. The 10th edition of the event stands out as one of the main platforms to showcase new technologies, equipment, services, and knowledge focused on these segments, and is also a strategic space for the promotion of business with the armed forces, special and police forces, consulting, corporate security, and government agencies. By Dialogo April 14, 2015last_img read more

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Google Has Quietly Dropped Ban on Personally Identifiable Web Tracking

first_imgBy Julia Angwin, ProPublicaWhen Google bought the advertising network DoubleClick in 2007, Google founder Sergey Brin said that privacy would be the company’s “number one priority when we contemplate new kinds of advertising products.”And, for nearly a decade, Google did in fact keep DoubleClick’s massive database of web-browsing records separate by default from the names and other personally identifiable information Google has collected from Gmail and its other login accounts.But this summer, Google quietly erased that last privacy line in the sand – literally crossing out the lines in its privacy policy that promised to keep the two pots of data separate by default. In its place, Google substituted new language that says browsing habits “may be” combined with what the company learns from Gmail and other tools.The change is enabled by default for new Google accounts. Existing users were prompted to opt-in to the change this summer.The practical result of the change is that the DoubleClick ads that follow people around on the web may now be customized to them based on the keywords they used in their Gmail. It also means that Google could now, if it wished to, build a complete portrait of a user by name, based on everything they write in email, every website they visit and the searches they conduct.The move is a sea change for Google and a further blow to the online ad industry’s longstanding contention that web tracking is mostly anonymous. In recent years, Facebook, offline data brokers and others have increasingly sought to combine their troves of web tracking data with people’s real names. But until this summer, Google held the line.“The fact that DoubleClick data wasn’t being regularly connected to personally identifiable information was a really significant last stand,” said Paul Ohm, faculty director of the Center on Privacy and Technology at Georgetown Law.“It was a border wall between being watched everywhere and maintaining a tiny semblance of privacy,” he said. “That wall has just fallen.”Google spokeswoman Andrea Faville emailed a statement describing Google’s change in privacy policy as an update to adjust to the “smartphone revolution”“We updated our ads system, and the associated user controls, to match the way people use Google today: across many different devices,” Faville wrote. She added that the change “is 100% optional–if users do not opt-in to these changes, their Google experience will remain unchanged.” (Read Google’s entire statement.)Existing Google users were prompted to opt-into the new tracking this summer through a request with titles such as “Some new features for your Google account.”The “new features” received little scrutiny at the time. Wired wrote that it “gives you more granular control over how ads work across devices.” In a personal tech column, the New York Times also described the change as “new controls for the types of advertisements you see around the web.”Connecting web browsing habits to personally identifiable information has long been controversial.Privacy advocates raised a ruckus in 1999 when DoubleClick purchased a data broker that assembled people’s names, addresses and offline interests. The merger could have allowed DoubleClick to combine its web browsing information with people’s names. After an investigation by the Federal Trade Commission, DoubleClick sold the broker at a loss.In response to the controversy, the nascent online advertising industry formed the Network Advertising Initiative in 2000 to establish ethical codes. The industry promised to provide consumers with notice when their data was being collected, and options to opt out.Most online ad tracking remained essentially anonymous for some time after that. When Google bought DoubleClick in 2007, for instance, the company’s privacy policy stated: “DoubleClick’s ad-serving technology will be targeted based only on the non-personally-identifiable information.”In 2012, Google changed its privacy policy to allow it to share data about users between different Google services – such as Gmail and search. But it kept data from DoubleClick – whose tracking technology is enabled on half of the top 1 million websites – separate.But the era of social networking has ushered in a new wave of identifiable tracking, in which services such as Facebook and Twitter have been able to track logged-in users when they shared an item from another website.Two years ago, Facebook announced that it would track its users by name across the Internet when they visit websites containing Facebook buttons such as “Share” and “Like” – even when users don’t click on the button. (Here’s how you can opt out of the targeted ads generated by that tracking).Offline data brokers also started to merge their mailing lists with online shoppers. “The marriage of online and offline is the ad targeting of the last 10 years on steroids,” said Scott Howe, chief executive of broker firm Acxiom.To opt-out of Google’s identified tracking, visit the Activity controls on Google’s My Account page, and uncheck the box next to “Include Chrome browsing history and activity from websites and apps that use Google services.” You can also delete past activity from your account.ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for their newsletter. Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York last_img read more

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Saliva ban would be hard to police, says Australia’s Hazlewood

first_imgAustralia quick Josh Hazlewood says the proposed ban on cricketers using saliva to shine the ball will be difficult to police but ultimately might not make much difference to the art of swing bowling.The International Cricket Council’s (ICC) cricket committee has recommended the ban on the use of spit when the sport returns after the coronavirus shutdown because of fears it could lead to the spread of COVID-19.Cricketers have long used saliva and sweat to shine one side of the ball, altering the aerodynamics in an attempt to generate movement in the air as it flies towards the batsman. Sweat, which carries less risk of transmission, will still be allowed if the ban is enforced but Hazlewood thought it would be tough for umpires to end the practise of applying a bit of spit to the ball.”I’d like saliva to be used obviously but if that’s what they’ve put forward, I guess everyone is playing the same game,” he told Sydney’s Daily Telegraph.”Once it comes back to you as a bowler, it’s second nature to just give it a little touch up if you see something, and that’s going to be hard to stop to be honest. And it’s a tough thing to monitor for sure.”Hazlewood, while admitting he had no medical training, questioned whether the measure was necessary at all given that players live in each other’s pockets during matches.As to whether it would make much of a difference to the effectiveness of pace bowling, Hazlewood was uncertain.”Sweat probably makes (the ball) a bit wetter if that makes sense. Makes it a bit heavier,” he added.”I think you’ll use very small amounts because people have sweaty hands anyway and it gets on the ball … I don’t think this will have as big an impact as what people think.”Topics :last_img read more

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