Online intervention programme will help students moderate their drinking

first_imgLimerick’s Student Radio Station Wired FM Celebrates 25 Years on Air Week-long Celebration of Women as MIC Marks International Women’s Day Attending the launch of ePUB  were  Caoimhe Guinnane, Students’ Union Vice-President, LIT; Tom McLaughlin, MIC student and Caolan O’Donnell, Students Union Welfare Officer, UL. Advertisement Email Women in the Creative Arts to take centre stage at LIT’s International Women’s Day Flagship Event Print Linkedin Previous articleBeyond the neon runesNext article‘A Life in Theatre’ Editor RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR New Report from MIC Reveals the Reality of Human Trafficking in Ireland Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Entitled Electronic Personal Use Barometer or e-PUB, the programme will be  implemented in all three third level institutions in the Mid-West region as part of a collaborative initiative between Mary Immaculate College (MIC) Limerick Institute of Technology (LIT) University of Limerick (UL) and the Mid-West Third Level Drug and Alcohol Awareness Project.e-PUB is a recognised, evidence based, on-line intervention and personalised feedback tool developed by counsellors and psychologists at San Diego State University, and is currently in use at over 550 campuses in the United States, Canada, Australia and Ireland.The programme is anonymous and encourages participants to examine their individual drinking patterns, their personal and family risk factors and the health and personal consequences of their behaviours. It then provides user personalised feedback designed to support and motivate individuals to adapt and, if necessary, reduce their consumption patterns. The programme is self-guided, and requires no face-to-face contact time with a counsellor or administrator.According to recent figures 2.48 million in Ireland drink with at least 75% of all alcohol consumed as part of a binge drinking session.  Those aged 18-24 years are most likely to have a harmful drinking pattern.Speaking at the launch of the e-PUB initiative, Gearoid Prendergast, Co-ordinator of the Forum, said: “This is an exciting and innovative project which has brought together the three main 3rd Level Institutions in the City with a view to encouraging participants to examine their individual drinking patterns, their personal and family risk factors and the health and personal consequences of their behaviours”. Speaking on behalf of all three Students Unions Caoimhe Guinnane, LIT Students’ Union Vice-President said that she hoped the e-PUB programme would help students become more aware of their alcohol consumption. “This programme will be a tool to anonymously encourage students to seek help via the information of local services provided if necessary” she said.e-PUB has already been implemented with great success in a number of other Irish 3rd level institutions, including UCC and NUIG. TAGSe-PUBLITMary Immaculate CollegeUL An online alcohol intervention programme, which aims to encourage third-level students to reflect on their drinking behaviour, is to be rolled out across colleges in Limerick. WhatsApp NewsEducationHealthOnline intervention programme will help students moderate their drinkingBy Editor – March 24, 2017 1153 Facebook Limerick Post Show | FOLM Project International Women’s Day LIT Twitter 22/3/2017 Attending the launch of ePUB – an online alcohol awareness app for 3rd level Institutions werePhotograph Liam Burke Press 22last_img read more

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Geary’s £1m bakery set to double loaf production

first_imgLeicestershire-based Geary’s Bakeries is to relocate to a new site and double production of its loaves, following a £1m investment.Joint managing director Tony Marriott told British Baker that Geary’s hopes to be up and running at its new bakery, in Barrow upon Soar, by the end of March 2010. “The company is relocating from its original site – in Ratby – where it has been for 104 years,” he said.The move is due to the increasing logistical difficulties of, for example, getting supplies, such as flour silo deliveries to the bakery, which is currently located in the centre of a village. “It’s also now a very old building,” said Marriott.The move will enable the bakery to ramp up its production. “We currently produce around 700-800,000 speciality rolls a week and about 50,000 loaves a week – and we are expecting to be able to produce 100,000 loaves a week,” he said.The firm has been working on getting the new site ready since June last year, including extensions to the building. The new bakery, based in Hayhill Industrial Estate, is only 10 miles from the old site, but was not previously a bakery, so there has been a lot of work involved, explained Marriott. “Travelling ovens are being put in at the moment, and the provers are already in,” he added.Geary’s had been looking for a suitable site for about three years. Marriott said it had been important to find one close to the original bakery, so that the existing staff could easily move with the firm.The bakery employs around 70 staff at present, but Marriott said there are hopes to employ around 110 staff when the new site is fully up and running.Geary’s predominantly produces bread and rolls for major retailers and sandwich producers, including Samworth Brothers and Uniq.last_img read more

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ITF Slams Flag States for Failure to Protect Seafarers

first_imgThe International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) has criticized flag states for failing to protect seafarers’ and passengers’ health during the humanitarian crisis caused by the coronavirus pandemic, as cruise ships scramble to find a port to allow them to dock.According to the union, the failure is evident in the latest unraveling of events that have seen cruise ships repeatedly being refused permission to dock and disembark passengers amid precautionary measures introduced by different governments aimed at curbing the spread of the virus.The latest course of events saw the coronavirus stricken Braemar being turned away from several Caribbean ports and spending days searching for somewhere to dock until Cuba agreed to allow the offloading of passengers and crew.In its latest update, Fred. Olsen Cruise Lines confirmed that the Braemar was alongside in the Port of Mariel and that four planes landed in Cuba which will fly guests back to the UK.“Any guests who have received a positive diagnosis for coronavirus, or have displayed any flu-like symptoms, plus their companions, will return to the UK on a separate flight,” the cruise liner said.“All guests on this flight will have medical professionals available and will have support with any onward travel arrangements or requirements. In accordance with advice from Public Health England, all guests on this flight will be required to self-isolate for 14 days once they have returned home.”As informed, there are currently 28 guests in isolation, having shown influenza-like symptoms. These include two people who tested positive for COVID-19 during the ship’s last port of call, Willemstad, Curaçao, on March 10th.Previously, 27 crew were put in isolation, including one doctor.However, the ITF said that the flights to the UK were solely applicable for British passengers and that it was unclear what will happen with the guests and crew of other nationalities.Furthermore, there are also reports that more than 100 Australian doctors and medical professionals are stuck on a cruise ship off Chile aboard the Roald Amundsen after Chile banned cruise ships from docking in response to the Covid-19 pandemic.“Attention needs to be called on the failure of the governments of Bermuda and the Bahamas in the cases of the Grand Princess and the Braemar for not accepting their responsibility to remedy the problem for its sovereign vessels,” Dave Heindel, chair of the ITF seafarers’ section, said.“In each of these cases, the US, and following a diplomatic scramble, the Cuban government, have been working directly with the cruise liners to address the situation. But there has been little or no mention of the responsibility and duty of care of flag state governments to assist seafarers employed on these vessels.” Under international law, the onus for the health and safety of the crew and passengers, and for the wider public that could be impacted, is on the flag state governments.“Flag states have sovereignty over their vessels, but for the coronavirus-affected cruise ships responsibility has fallen on the port states, national governments of the passengers and crew or even a third country. For instance, the Braemar was refused to dock in its own territory, with the vessel sent Cuba after the government authorised the offloading or passengers and crew,” said Heindel.“This is simply insane and unsustainable. If the world continues to accept the Flag of Convenience system in its current form, it should be pointed out for its failures. The world should be concerned about the lack of policies and inability of flag states to react and enact measures in line with their responsibility to protect workers and tackle the transmission of the Covid-19 virus.”The ITF, and its maritime affiliates representing seafarers and dockers around the world, urged flag states to take responsibility and be accountable for the health and wellbeing of all workers and passengers onboard their vessels, especially the seafarers that live and work on board for many months at a time.last_img read more

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