Tight market forces firms to halt graduate job plans

first_imgA quarter of employers have reduced the number of graduates they are lookingto recruit because of the deteriorating economic climate, research reveals. The study for the Association of Graduate Recruiters shows that one in fivefirms have deferred up to 60 graduate job offers. Carl Gilleard, chief executive of the Association of Graduate Recruiters,said the findings reveal that “these are uncertain times” forgraduate recruiters. “The reduction in graduate jobs suggests that we are in for a muchtighter graduate market. Recruiters are still active, but are unsure about andunwilling to quote numbers,” he said. According to the survey of 166 employers, eight out of 10 companies havedeferred graduate jobs for 12 months. One in 10 firms have withdrawn joboffers. Graduate Recruitment in an Uncertain Labour Market finds that although 13per cent of organisations are increasing graduate intake, there has been anoverall 5.5 per cent decrease in the number of graduate vacancies. Gilleard urges employers to defer rather than withdraw job offers wheneverpossible. He said, “Not withdrawing the offer still gives them theopportunity to get back some return on their investment, as graduaterecruitment is an expensive business. “When I entered the labour market over 30 years ago, I had a job offerwithdrawn and I have never forgotten it, although I’m sure that companies onlywithdraw an offer when they have no alternative.” Gilleard warns recruiters to keep a high profile in the graduate recruitmentmarket so they are ready to attract the best talent when the economy recovers. www.agr.org.uk By Paul Nelson Tight market forces firms to halt graduate job plansOn 23 Oct 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Wrangling with risk-based capital

first_img 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr It’s time for a more rational approach to managing risk.by: James CollinsLast Thanksgiving—for the first time ever—my wife attempted to make a Tofurky. The commentary from the kitchen was, as we say, rather illuminating:“Wait, which one is the tofu? Wait, that’s the gravy?”“Why is the cat circling my feet and why do I smell canned cat food?”“No microwave instructions????”“Would it be bad if I added chicken stock to it?” (Answer is no, chicken stock is like donated plasma from chickens).Tofurky is just like other misnamed foods such as “Spaghetti squash” (which is as far from spaghetti as Lindsey Lohan is from being an actress) and Kale (which looks, feels, and reminds you of lettuce but tastes like something your mother would mend denim jeans with).And that brings us to something else that isn’t what it seems: NCUA’s Risk Based Capital proposal.Since the first attempt to establish the rule had a “little bit of pushback,” per NCUA—which is a bit like saying “the defensive front line of the Arizona Cardinals strongly recommends that the opposing running back not advance”—the plan is to try again.On its surface, NCUA has a daunting task. It must encapsulate all of the following risks into a simple, easy-to-understand ratio: continue reading »last_img read more

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Syracuse wins possession battle, squelches counterattacks in victory over Dartmouth

first_imgHendrik Hilpert stood up against the back netting of the goal and just a few defenders were placed on the goal line. Dartmouth forward Justin Donawa boomed his first shot from the left side of the net off of Syracuse defender Miles Robinson.Louis Cross stepped up next to the post and Amadu Kunateh’s shot struck him in the face. Kunateh dropped on his knees and pounded his fist into the ground after another Dartmouth chance sailed wide of the net.“It all happened a bit too fast,” Cross said. “I saw Miles get a block off. I thought I just need to get on the line. I saw him shaping his shot and he smacked me right in the face. I was just happy to see it go out.”“We make fun of Louis taking one in the face,” SU head coach McIntyre joked later in the press conference, “He’s a good-looking kid.”The three-shot set was one of several scoring chances SU surrendered that left Dartmouth players laid out on the SU Soccer Stadium grass when the game finished. The Orange (14-5-3, 3-4-1 Atlantic Coast) narrowly slipped past a Dartmouth (12-6-1, 6-1 Ivy) counterattack that pressured SU throughout the game.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe 2-1 win pushes SU to its third Sweet 16 in four years, and the Orange will play the winner of UCLA and No. 11 seed Seattle on Sunday Nov. 29 at 1 p.m.“We pride ourselves on this, we have one speed, and that’s full speed,” McIntyre said. “Sometimes that means if you are going for that third goal, you can open yourself up a little bit and I thought when the ball turned over … it caused problems.”Syracuse limited Dartmouth’s chances by simply holding possession. Even as the ball rotated back out to the midfield line, SU’s 3-5-2 formation, with five midfielders, capped the field of play to the Big Green’s side of the field.Dartmouth pushed the pace when it did get the ball back against SU’s back three of Robinson, Cross and Kamal Miller. Dartmouth blasted 13 shots to the Orange’s 14, the closest an unranked team has come to outshooting Syracuse all season.“They commit a lot of players forward and once you break their initial pressure, I think you kind of make the effort to get forward, we did a good job of that,” Dartmouth head coach Chad Riley said. “It’s hard, though. Their pressure’s very good.”In the last 20 minutes of play, Dartmouth racked up four sequences of chances that could have dissolved SU’s lead.On the first, a cross bounded into the middle of the box, unstopped by a few defenders just a few feet within the side of the 18-yard box. Kunateh battled several SU defenders in the center of the box and nicked the ball out of the air. It curved wide of the defenders and of Hilpert’s hand.The shot clanged off the post and Kunateh threw himself on the ground after the miss.Less than two minutes later, Hilpert dove from his line in front of the net to catch a cross with a Dartmouth player making a run to the ball.For about 12 minutes, the Big Green’s onslaught ceased. Dartmouth hardly held the ball long enough to push into Syracuse’s end of the field.“Jesus, get the ball back,” a Big Green coached yelled out to his team as SU held onto the ball.Eventually Syracuse did give up possession after a Kenny Lassiter shot was saved. Soon after came the series of shots that required SU’s defenders to step in for Hilpert.Kunateh then corralled a long pass as time was about to expire and blazed toward Hilpert. The offside flag had gone up, but Kunateh was taken down in the 18-yard box. His teammates thought he was fouled, appealing to the referee for a call.When the referees signaled for the end of the game, several Dartmouth players dropped to the grass.“We feel,” McIntyre said, pausing while he racked his brain, “maybe it’s not fortunate, but happy.”After all of Dartmouth’s chances, fortunate would have been apt, too. Comments Related Stories Julian Buescher assists on both Syracuse goals in NCAA tournament win Published on November 22, 2015 at 7:31 pm Contact Chris: [email protected] | @ChrisLibonaticenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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March Madness 2019: East Region stats, upsets, sleepers that will decide the NCAA bracket

first_img…And the agony of defeat : Sporting News staff recalls their most heartbreaking memories from the NCAA Tournament. Get your tissues ready.Top 80 upsets in March Madness history :  It’s not March Madness until there’s an upset. Ranking the best we ever saw:Best buzzer-beaters in NCAA Tournament history :  The defining shots of the NCAA Tournament, and the reason it’s dubbed “March Madness.” Duke earned the No. 1 seed in the East Region on Selection Sunday. But, the Blue Devils will face multiple top challengers as they attempt to once again reach the Final Four.Duke lost to Virginia Tech during the regular season and may have to play it again in the tournament while Michigan State, who was also in contention for a top spot in the bracket, is seeded second in the region and is a threat to make a deep run. MARCH MADNESS: Interactive and printable bracketsNCAA bracket: East RegionNo. 1 seed Duke’s earliest threatNo. 9 UCF: The Golden Knights are a talented team led by guard B.J. Taylor and 7-foot-6-inch center Tacko Fall. They could challenge the Blue Devils if they top VCU in the first round.UCF coach Johnny Dawkins played for Duke’s Mike Krzyzewski and served as an assistant under him for nine seasons.The most eye-popping stat3: Duke is the top ranked team in this year’s tournament. Only three teams in that position have won the championship since overall seeding began in 2004, according to ESPN.MORE REGION PREVIEWS: West | Midwest | SouthThe most overrated seedNo. 6 Maryland: The Terrapins were inconsistent all season long and have losses to Illinois, Penn State and Nebraska on their resume. They’ll have a hard time with the winner of the Belmont-Temple First Four matchup.The most dangerous sleeperNo. 12 Liberty: The Flames are 58th in the NET Rankings, ahead of Minnesota as well as Arizona State and directly behind Seton Hall. They also came away with a win at UCLA and beat bubble team Lipscomb twice, including in the ASUN title game, in 2018-19.Liberty is balanced offensively as six different players average more than 7.3 points per game. It’ll give No. 5 Mississippi State a game and has a chance to play into the second weekend.SN’S MARCH MADNESS HQ:Predictor tool | Best bracket names | TicketsThe first-round upset alertNo. 3 LSU:  The Tigers finished with the outright SEC regular season title and were in contention for a No. 1 seed entering Championship Week. LSU, however, has recently dealt with off-the-court issues, including the indefinite suspension of coach Will Wade, and lost in its opening game of the conference tournament. No. 14 Yale upset Baylor in 2016 — the last time it reached the tournament — and could do the same thing again to the Tigers.The Final Four pickDuke: The Blue Devils were clearly the best team in the country this season with a healthy Zion Williamson. They’ll be tested in the East Region but will have the two best players on the court in every game — Williamson and fellow freshman RJ Barrett — which gives them a major advantage.March Madness features from Sporting News”40 Minutes of Hell” to Hog Heaven :  Nolan Richardson’s 1993-94 Arkansas team will go down as one of the most fun SEC title-winning teams of all time. It was something he built, one minute at a time.A barrier-breaking title : The 1961-62 Cincinnati Bearcats made history when they started four black players in their NCAA title game win over Ohio State. We remember the importance of that groundbreaking win.An Oral History of Steph Curry’s 2008 Breakout : In 2008, a little-known, baby-faced guard from Davidson completely took over the NCAA Tournament.Upset City : Reliving the wildest opening venue in NCAA Tournament history.The Fagan Jinx : They’re not just upset “alerts” when Sporting News’ Ryan Fagan is in attendance. Recapping the many improbable upsets Fagan has been on hand to witness. More than a timeout : The 1993 NCAA Tournament is more than Chris Webber’s ill-fated timeout in the national championship game against UNC. Danny and the Miracles : Recalling Kansas’ improbable 1988 title run.Chalmers’ shot still resonates : Mario Chalmers never gets tired talking about his 3-pointer against Memphis in 2008.DeCourcy’s best of 30 years : Sporting News’ Mike DeCourcy ranks the best games he has witnessed from 30 years’ worth of NCAA Tournament coverage. The thrill of victory… : Sporting News staff recall their favorite memories of the NCAA Tournament. last_img read more

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