Anti-social behaviour making life in Limerick City East a ‘living hell’

first_imgNewsLocal NewsAnti-social behaviour making life in Limerick City East a ‘living hell’By Alan Jacques – June 27, 2014 1100 Advertisement The disused graveyard at the rear of the Marian shrine in Garryowen which has been the site of anti-social activity.RESIDENTS in several housing estates in City East claim they are being tormented by anti-social behaviour from drug-taking teenage gangs who’ve made life a “living hell” for families.One concerned resident from the Springfield estate on the Old Singland Road told the Limerick Post this week that ongoing drug use and dealing in the area is plain to see in broad day light and that underage drinking in the area has now become “rampant”. They also claimed residents in the area are left feeling vulnerable and anxious on a daily basis by underage gangs, ranging in size from 15 to 50 individuals, that sit around open areas “taking drugs, drinking and fornicating in public”.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up According to one source, Castletroy residents have been threatened and told there windows would be broken as well as young children and toddlers having been hit by objects. One resident in Springfield estate who asked a gang to clean up a mess they had left in the area was then threatened at knifepoint.“Instead of the unreasonable response I assumed I would get, I was instead subjected to masses of abuse from one individual who told me my windows would be broken. He then told another individual to stick something in my face and that’s when he pulled a knife on me,” the man told the Limerick Post after the attack.Another householder in the Castletroy estate is living in such fear that she has resorted to driving to the local shop — a mere 100m from her front door.Meanwhile in another City East housing estate, old people are afraid to go out in the dark, kids can’t play outside and householders fear for their property will be vandalised or damaged.According to  Sinn Féin councillor Séighin Ó Ceallaigh, one of the worst hit areas for anti-social behaviour in City East is at the steps next to the shrine in Garryowen.“Young people are part of these communities, and must learn of community respect. They might not realise it but they are causing huge harm to the Garryowen area and its residents, and that there are alternatives to anti-social behaviour,” said the 21-year-old public representative.Cmhlr Ó Ceallaigh is encouraging all young people in the city to have respect for others, whom he believes, are entitled to live in “peaceful areas”. He is also seeking extra measures such as CCTV cameras and an extra Garda presence in badly affected areas to help tackle the anti-social behaviour which he deems a “social and environmental issue”. Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live center_img Facebook Print Previous articleThe afternoon AfterPartyNext article#video #newmusic PROTOBABY – ‘Stages’ Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Email TAGSCastletroyfeaturedGarryowenlimerickLimerick City EastSéighin Ó CeallaighSinn Fein Linkedin Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads last_img read more

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Couple rescued from ice cave burned hair to keep warm: ‘We would’ve died’ in hours

first_imgSpencer and Jessica Christiansen(ALTA, Wyo.) — Out of fuel for fire and battling frostbite, a young couple says they were prepared to die when emergency officers rescued them from a freezing-cold ice cave over the weekend.Spencer and Jessica Christiansen were soaking wet and fighting hypothermia when rescue workers pulled them out of the total darkness of an unmapped ice cave in Wyoming on Sunday night 30 hours after they entered and lost their way.“You know you’re headed down to your death and they found us just right before we had to burn the last of what we had left to survive a few more hours,” Jessica Christiansen told “Good Morning America” in an exclusive interview on Wednesday. “We knew we only had about an hour or two before we would’ve died.”After getting drenched in a waterfall, the Christiansens said they burned their backpacks, some of their gear and even clumps of her hair in an effort to stay warm. But they eventually ran out of things to burn.“We were so cold, shivering and our fingers were numb because our gloves were soaked from going through river canals so we decided for a moment to slow down, make a fire, get some energy and food,” Spencer Christiansen told “GMA.” “We were clammed up, we were miserable, we were wet, so we had to think of what we were going to do next.”The Idaho couple spent three weeks researching the cave and took all the necessary precautions before they entered, but “incorrect information” caused them to lose their way, he said.“I was excited! I just wanted a quick adventure. I wanted to have a good adventure for a day,” Spencer Christiansen said. “I spent three weeks, nonstop, to try and gather as much info as possible. … We came up with very little.”The husband and wife, both experienced climbers, said they entered the Darby Canyon Ice Cave early Saturday morning with plans to explore for a few hours. The trip was a birthday celebration for Spencer, whose birthday came on Aug. 12, the day they were rescued.They left their 1-year-old daughter, Aurora, with her grandmother and told the family to notify the police if they didn’t return the next day.The families’ decision to call for help Sunday morning may have saved the couple’s lives, according to Teton County Undersheriff Matt Carr.“They did have a plan. They told [their family] if they weren’t back by a certain time to give us a call,” Carr told “GMA.” At least that triggered us to get going in the right direction because it does sound like the condition we found them in was pretty important that we get moving in the direction as soon as possible.”Carr said the cave is like a maze and only expert spelunkers are encouraged to explore it. Jessica fell 20 feet while climbing a frozen waterfall at one point, but Spencer thankfully caught her to avoid even further disaster.“The cave is a series of large caverns and tight crawls and there are areas where you are literally on your hands and toes trying to squeeze through and then that connects to some larger caverns as well,” Carr said. “There is a lot of running water, ice cold water, running throughout there that you have to cross to get in.”Rescuers found the pair shivering and unable to move when they arrived.Both are doing well now, though they were treated for frostbite on their hands.Search and rescue volunteer K.C. Bess said it took the team between five and six hours to locate the couple.“Where we found them they were 25 feet up in a small hole or cavern and one of our team members had to ascend up a rope to get to them, do an assessment on them, [and] build an anchor to help them repel out of that spot,” Bess told “GMA.” “They were starting to really shiver a lot, shaking, and showing some signs of hypothermia.”The couple believes they were rescued just in time.“It’s really scary to think you’re leaving a child with no parents and no way out. It’s really cold and it’s really scary to face your death for sure,” Jessica Christiansen said. “The scariest part it got to was when Spencer was scared. I had total faith in him the whole time to get me out of there, but when I saw how scared he was I knew it was the end for us.”She says the “terrifying” experience has changed her and her husband for the better.“Things that were important before, definitely aren’t anymore. … I can’t watch regular TV or look at Instagram or Facebook because selfies aren’t important anymore, I don’t care,” Jessica Christiansen said.Her husband echoed her sentiments, calling the exploration an adventure that he’ll never forget.“You kinda get to the point where you say you kinda realize what’s important and what’s not,” he said. “That comes after you escape but when you get to that point, the things that you stressed about so much are usually tiny pathetic things that don’t even actually matter in the big scale.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Safe well water

first_imgWater isn’t just for drinkingPoor water quality not only affects drinking water. It can also affect a variety of household functions. Contaminated water used for cooking may affect your health, while an excess of certain minerals can hamper cleaning tasks in the laundry or bathroom.Unfortunately, no single test can provide information on all possible contaminants. Bacteriological tests determine if water is free of disease-causing bacteria. But there are many types of tests that cover a variety of bacteria. The most common bacteriological test checks for E. coli and total coliform bacteria, which can come from fecal contamination. Mineral tests can determine if the mineral content is high enough to affect either health or the water’s aesthetic or cleaning capacities. This test often pinpoints calcium, magnesium, manganese, iron, copper and zinc. An abundance of these minerals can cause hard water, plumbing and laundry stains or bad odors. Pesticide and chemical tests are generally performed only if there is reason to believe a specific contaminant has entered the water system, such as pesticides.Inspect regularlyIt is important to regularly inspect your well for sources of contamination. Other potential problems can exist with the slab, the well screen, the building covering the well or landscaping. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension offers well assessment through the HOME*A*SYST program. These self-assessments determine the risks associated with your well. If you suspect a problem with your well water, contact a licensed well driller to inspect the well and have it tested for bacteria. This test should be done at least once a year, especially after well water disinfections. Have water testedWell testing can be done through local UGA Extension offices. Water samples are tested through the UGA Agricultural and Environmental Services Laboratory in Athens. A basic test, which tests for pH, hardness and more than 15 minerals, is $15. An expanded water test, which tests for minerals, soluble salts and alkalinity, is $50. Contact your UGA Extension office at 1-800-ASK-UGA1 for information on troubleshooting water quality issues or testing your well water for bacteria. Contact your county health department for information on how to take proper care of your septic system. Septic system problems can affect well water quality. You have frequent and unexplained illnesses in your household.Your neighbors find toxic chemicals in their well water.You are concerned about the lead pipes or soldering in your home.You detect a difference in the taste, smell or color of the water.You are buying a new home with a well that has been out of use.It comes from an improperly sealed or unprotected well, spring or cistern.You spill fertilizers, pesticides, oil, gasoline or other toxic substances on the ground in or near the well. Clean drinking water is a top priority for families. But homeowners who rely solely on well water can be open to certain risks. If your water is provided by a city or county source, it isn’t necessary to have it tested unless an in-house contamination is suspected. Public and municipal water supplies are routinely tested and must meet Environmental Protection Agency standards.Homeowner’s responsibilityWell water can become contaminated from various sources and can make homeowners sick. Since there are no federal or state monitoring regulations for private wells, it is the homeowner’s responsibility to make sure their well water is safe to drink. Well water may not be safe to drink if:last_img read more

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CUNA, trades file Supreme Court brief over Fair Housing Act

first_imgCUNA joined with other trade organizations Monday to file an amicus brief with the U.S. Supreme Court regarding a lawsuit that raises important questions about the scope of the Fair Housing Act. CUNA filed an amici curiae brief in April in City of Miami v. Wells Fargo and City of Miami v. Bank of America, and the Supreme Court agreed to hear the case in June.The city of Miami brought suit against the two banks arguing that discriminatory actions against city residents entitles the city to damages for indirect harm. The city argued that foreclosures and other events stemming from unfavorable mortgages resulted in lost revenue from lower property taxes and other incurred expenses.“These cities are not within the zone of interests protected by the Fair Housing Act. In enacting the FHA, Congress sought to protect individuals’ right to fair housing and to live in integrated communities,” reads CUNA’s brief, filed Monday. “It demonstrated no concern with cities’ interest in protecting their tax revenues as an objective of the FHA.”CUNA warned that the lower court ruling could set a bad precedent that would allow other entities, such as neighboring residents, municipalities and even local businesses, to maintain suits against financial institutions, even if the entity never had any direct dealings with a credit union or bank. continue reading » 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Governor Wolf Approves Funding for Abandoned Mine Cleanup Projects in Western Pennsylvania

first_imgGovernor Wolf Approves Funding for Abandoned Mine Cleanup Projects in Western Pennsylvania December 15, 2017 Environment,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf announced today that cleanup of acid mine drainage (AMD) and contaminated land at three sites in Western Pennsylvania communities will advance with funding through the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP).“It takes committed, hard work by many local partners to clean up the environmental degradation left by decades of coal mining before federal and state regulations began in the 1970s,” said Governor Wolf. “Their efforts are invaluable investments in our public health, the vitality of our communities, and the quality of our environment in Pennsylvania.”The grants are supported by the state Surface Mining Conservation and Reclamation Act (SMCRA) Fund, established to finance reclamation projects on lands scarred by surface mining, and through the AMD abatement and treatment program to support remediation of AMD in a Qualified Hydrologic Unit—a watershed, river basin, or other unit where AMD has significantly affected water quality in a way that adversely affects biological resources.“DEP is pleased to approve funding to support these partnerships in abandoned mine cleanup efforts,” said Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “Their work goes a long way to restore and protect the land and water for their communities and the citizens of Pennsylvania.”The newly funded projects are as follows:Fayette County: AMD Cleanup at Spruell Mine SiteWestern Pennsylvania Conservancy will design and build a passive AMD treatment system at the abandoned Spruell Mine site. The system will remove 5 pounds of iron and 2 pounds of manganese daily from Glade Run to improve stream health. The project was awarded a $414,650 SMCRA Grant.Somerset County: Hawk View RevegetationThe Somerset County Conservation District will repair three acres of land, known as Hawk View, at an abandoned mine site now owned by Somerset County Conservancy and designated a Qualified Hydrologic Unit. Vegetation was killed by acidic material exposed by erosion. The project, which received a $41,008 AMD Set-Aside Grant, consists of laying down a thin layer of crushed limestone and top soil and replanting with native vegetation.Jefferson and Clarion Counties: Mill Creek Watershed Designation as Qualified Hydrologic Unit The Headwaters Charitable Trust will develop the Mill Creek Watershed as a Qualified Hydrologic Unit in a project awarded a $27,850 AMD Set-Aside Grant. This designation will enable the Mill Creek Coalition to leverage additional funding from the AMD Set-Aside Fund to allow continued operation of 14 passive treatment systems in the watershed and develop additional treatment systems to maintain recovered sections of the main stem of Mill Creek and Little Mill Creek.center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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David L. Nelson

first_imgDavid L. Nelson, age 58 of Batesville, died Tuesday, September 15, 2020. Born February 8, 1962 in Covington, Kentucky, he is the son of Betty (Nee: Potter) and Carl Nelson. He married Christina Mitchell November 28, 1998 at Elizabethtown, Ohio. Dedicated would be the word to best describe Dave. He was a devoted husband and father, who treasured time spent with Christina, his children and grandchildren. Dave was also hard working and willing to work long hours on the job. He spent 28 years with Welsh Excavating Company in Harrison, Ohio as Transportation Manager. During his off times he enjoyed outdoor activities which included boating, riding quads, hunting, fishing, mowing and keeping the yard in order. Dave also loved to travel and was a long-suffering Bengals fan. He is survived by his wife Christina; daughters Tasha Nelson of Batesville; sons Michael Nelson of Harrison, Ohio, Paul Nelson of Batesville; sister Pam Shaw; brother Dan Anderson and seven grandchildren. In addition to his parents, he is also preceded in death by his daughter Shannan Mirick and brother Rick Nelson.Visitation for the public will be Tuesday, September 22nd, from 10:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. at the Weigel Funeral Home. The current Governor’s mandate requires all attendees wear a facemask and observe physical distancing. The mask must cover the individual’s nose and mouth at all times. Following a private service after the visitation, Dave’s wishes were to be cremated. Memorials can be made to the family who will determine which organization to designate them to afterwards.last_img read more

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