Womens basketball Buckeyes dominate the paint struggle defensively in win versus Cleveland

OSU redshirt sophomore Makayla Waterman (25) attempts a shot during the Buckeyes’ game against Cleveland State on Nov. 16. Credit: Carlee Frank | For The LanternTwo days removed from its first loss of the season, Ohio State recovered to down the Cleveland State Vikings 96-78 on Wednesday evening in Columbus.Despite struggling defensively throughout, the No. 7 Buckeyes (2-1) used their size and athleticism as an advantage to take over the game. The Buckeyes outscored the undersized Vikings 60-24 in the paint.“They’re not very big, so a point of emphasis was to get the ball around the basket,” coach Kevin McGuff said.The inside effort was led by redshirt junior forward Stephanie Mavunga, who put up 12 points and 10 rebounds in 14 minutes. Freshman forward Tori McCoy had the best night of her young career, adding 12 points and six boards.Cleveland State had its chances to score in the first half, but they struggled to finish. OSU junior guard Kelsey Mitchell led all scorers with 14 points at the half and OSU senior forward Shayla Cooper added 12 points on 6-for-8 shooting.The Vikings outscored the Buckeyes 8-4 over the first 1:24 of the third quarter, but that’s the closest they would get in the second half. A 17-0 run gave OSU a 30-point lead and the Buckeyes would close out the quarter leading 79-52.Cleveland State would go on to outscore the Buckeyes 26-17 in the final quarter. OSU held its largest lead of 33 with 6:43 left in the final frame, but the Vikings climbed to within 18 before the final buzzer sounded.“We still let them shoot a lot,” Mitchell said. “Our defense still was not good.”Mitchell finished with a game-high 31 points on 12-for-19 shooting from the field, including a 7-for-14 mark from 3-point territory. Cooper and freshman guard Kiara Lewis each added 12 points.The Buckeyes shot 51.9 percent from the floor, while Cleveland State shot just 39.4 percent.“We missed, I thought, some open shots,” McGuff said. “Especially Sierra [Calhoun] and Asia [Doss], they usually shoot it a little better, but it wasn’t there tonight.”Defensive struggles continueThe night was highlighted by the Buckeyes’ interior play, rebounding and a strong night for Mitchell, but the underlying issue of OSU’s defensive play was still evident. The Buckeyes were sluggish to start the game and allowed Cleveland State to get plenty of good looks.“We had a lack of communication on several possessions,” McGuff said. “I thought we had a good third quarter defensively and just were real spotty to end the game; kind of lost our focus and intensity down the stretch.”In the third quarter, OSU’s defense held the Vikings to just two points in the paint and five turnovers, and Cleveland State managed to convert on just four shots from the field.In the fourth, however, with the game in hand, the Buckeyes reverted to less-than-stellar defensive play. OSU allowed nine fast-break points and 12 points in the paint.“It’s a lack of effort,” Mitchell said. “And that’s the whole team; myself on down, coaches on down.”OSU overcame some of its defensive issues thanks to solid work on the boards. The Buckeyes outrebounded the Vikings 51-32 and limited the opponent’s second-chance opportunities throughout the contest.Even though the Buckeyes’ defensive issues were covered up by other aspects of its game on Wednesday, Mitchell said that OSU still needs to take pride in its defensive efforts.“You can’t teach it,” Mitchell said. “You can do all the help defense, you can do all the drills that we need to do, but at the end of the day it’s about you and yourself.”Up nextLIU Brooklyn will travel to Columbus to take on the Buckeyes on Saturday, Nov. 19. Tipoff is set for noon. read more

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Christie to be offered a new deal – Rodgers

first_imgCeltic Football Club manager Brendan Rodgers has revealed the club are set to offer Ryan Christie a new contract.The Scotland midfielder came off the bench to score Celtic’s third goal as they overcame Hearts 3-0 to secure a place in the Scottish League Cup final.“He’s someone that of course, we would look to commit to,” Rodgers said, according to Evening Times.“The club have been talking to his representatives but I’m not aware of any movement. I tend to focus on working with the players.”“He is in his last year but we have had other players like Stuart Armstrong. My focus is on making them better as players, giving them a future here to be involved and be a part of.”“Hopefully then the other stuff can sort itself out. He is definitely a player that we would love to keep. He is a fantastic player. You saw his contribution today. You saw it at Aberdeen when he was there. It was step-by-step but now is 23.”“He is at a really good age to come in and have the personality to play at a big club. He did well against Leipzig so he can make a valuable contribution to this team.”Leicester City, Manchester UnitedMatch Preview: Manchester United vs Leicester City Boro Tanchev – September 13, 2019 Old Trafford is the venue for the Premier League encounter between Manchester United and Leicester City, which kicks off at 16:00 (CET) on Saturday.“It’s been a process with Ryan. When I first came in, I felt he could be in and around the squad and he played some games.”“But for him to be able to give his best to Celtic and cope with the pressures of being at a big club, he had to go out and feel that pressure on a weekly basis.”“He went to a great club in Aberdeen with a great manager, so he felt that pressure playing.”“I always felt he could come back and then make a contribution because you need such personality to play for the big clubs and play in big games.”“Since he’s come back, he’s shown that. He’s come into games, he started games and you saw his impact.”“He scored a brilliant goal and was involved in two others.”last_img read more

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Police seek publics help in two separate shootings

first_img Related Items:#magneticmedianews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppNassau, Bahamas, February 4, 2017 – Police are seeking the public’s help in two separate shooting incidents that has left a man dead and two others detained in hospital on Friday 3rd February 2017.  In the first incident, shortly before 7:30pm, two men were sitting in a vehicle on Durham Street off Mount Royal Avenue, when two males armed with handguns approached and shot them before fleeing on foot. The two men were taken to hospital where one of them later succumbed. The other man remains in serious condition.In the second incident, shortly before 12:00midnight, a man was sitting in his Honda Civic vehicle on St. Cecilia Street, Chippingham, when a man armed with a handgun approached and robbed him of cash and a gold chain. The gunman then took the victim’s vehicle and shot him before speeding off. The victim was taken to hospital where his condition is listed as stable.Investigations are ongoing in both incidents.#MagneticMediaNews Electricity Cost of Service Study among the big agenda items at September 11 Cabinet meeting Recommended for you ALERT # 2 ON POTENTIAL TROPICAL CYCLONE NINE ISSUED BY THE BAHAMAS DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY THURSDAY 12TH SEPTEMBER, 2019 AT 9 PM EDT The Luxury of Grace Bay in Down Town Provolast_img read more

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Carter Durr Help Louisville Run Past Boise State 7455

first_img Box Score (PDF) Story Links BOISE, Idaho – Asia Durr scored 20 points and Arica Carter added 16 as No. 5 Louisville used a smothering defense to turn back upset-minded Boise State 74-55 on Monday night.Louisville (3-0) opened the third quarter with a 19-3 run to take control of the game, building a 50-33 advantage with 3:26 remaining.Boise State (3-1), which lost to Louisville 74-42 in the first round of the NCAA tournament in March, matched the Cardinals early, but struggled to keep pace with Louisville’s up-tempo game in the second half.Louisville shot 34.5 percent from the floor in the first half, before hitting 55 percent of its shots in the second half, including 63 percent from 3-point range. The Cardinals also outrebounded Boise State 37-29.Early in the second quarter, Louisville starting guard Jazmine Jones landed hard on her hip on a play underneath the basket and never returned.Braydey Hodgins and Riley Lupfer scored 12 and 11 points, respectively, to lead Boise State.BIG PICTURELouisville: Jeff Walz’s focus on getting his team more battled tested early is paying dividends. The Cardinals chose to play two of their first three games against NCAA Tournament participants from last season. Louisville passed with flying colors. But it doesn’t get any easier with two more NCAA tourney teams on the schedule this month.Boise State: The Broncos won the Mountain West last season and were picked to do so again. Despite the loss, Boise State should gain even more confidence heading into conference play later this season after going toe-to-toe with Louisville.UP NEXTLouisville: After opening with three games on the road, the Cardinals play Arizona State in Las Vegas on Friday.Boise State: The Broncos leave home for the first time this season, traveling to Long Beach, Calif., for the Beach Classic to face Idaho.Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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Scientists make singlephoton sources brighter

center_img This electron micrograph image of the single-photon sources developed at UCSB shows the etched trenches that leave behind large, 20-micron cavities. The different geometries influence the shape of the confined light field inside the cavity and thus dictate the polarization of the emitted photons. Image credit: Stefan Strauf, et al. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img

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Study of moon rocks shows barrage 4 billion years ago was mainly

first_img Explore further Earth’s makeup found to be more diverse than previously thought (Phys.org) — Researchers have known for some years that the Earth and moon were subjected to a veritable barrage of objects striking their surfaces nearly four million years ago, but less certain was whether those objects were asteroids, comets or even pieces of other protoplanets after they broke apart. Now however, new research by a group of lunar scientists has found, after studying moon rocks brought back by astronauts during the Apollo 16 mission, that it appears they were mostly asteroids. But not, they write in their paper published in the journal Science, the same kind as we see falling on our planet today. Citation: Study of moon rocks shows barrage 4 billion years ago was mainly asteroids (2012, May 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-05-moon-barrage-million-years-asteroids.html Journal information: Science The researchers, led by Katherine Joy, looked at specific types of moon rocks known as regolith breccias, which are in essence dirt balls with embedded fragments of rocks and other debris from impacts. They are believed to have formed somewhere around three and a half billion years ago, which was close to the time of the great barrage. To find out more about the fragments, they put samples in an electron microscope and also used other micro-probing techniques to get a closer look. In so doing they found that many of the fragments were of nearly the same type as carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, which come from certain types of asteroids.They also found a certain uniformity in the samples that is not present in samples from meteorites that have impacted the moon in more recent times, which the researchers write, suggests that such rocks striking the moon during the barrage were somewhat different from those that strike today which are quite diverse. They also found that the fragments found in different regolith breccias were sufficiently different from each other to rule out the possibility of them coming from a protoplanet that broke apart.That leaves asteroids as the most likely kind of object striking both the Earth and the moon during the barrage which other scientists have suggested occurred due to a relatively sudden change in the distance between the planets in the early solar system. The suspicion is that all or most of the planets formed in rather close proximity to the sun, then slowly moved farther away. If that was the case, then changes in gravitational effects caused by the planets would likely have had a profound impact on other bodies moving around, causing many of them perhaps, to run into one another and the planets. Some even suggest the bombardment that resulted could have been a major contributing factor to the development of life here on Earth, which many believe occurred right around the same time. More information: Direct Detection of Projectile Relics from the End of the Lunar Basin–Forming Epoch, Science DOI: 10.1126/science.1219633ABSTRACTThe lunar surface, a key proxy for the early Earth, contains relics of the asteroids and comets that have pummeled terrestrial planetary surfaces. Surviving fragments of projectiles in the lunar regolith provide a direct measure of the types and, thus, sources of exogenous material delivered to the Earth-Moon system. In ancient [>3.4 billion years ago (Ga)] regolith breccias from the Apollo 16 landing site we located mineral and lithologic relics of magnesian chondrules from chondritic impactors. These ancient impactor fragments are not nearly as diverse as those found in younger (3.4 Ga to today) regolith breccias and soils from the Moon, or that presently fall as meteorites to Earth. This suggests that primitive chondritic asteroids, originating from a similar source region, were common Earth-Moon-crossing impactors during the latter stages of the basin forming epoch. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2012 Phys.Orglast_img read more

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Electron spin changes as a general mechanism for general anesthesia

first_img Explore further Lipid solubility appears to be one key clue to anesthesia. The empirical cornerstone of anesthesiology is a 100 year old rule of thumb known as the Meyer-Overton relationship. It provides that the potency of general anesthetics (GAs), regardless of their size or structure, is approximately proportional to how soluble they are in lipids. Since that time, studies have suggested that GAs can also bind to lipid-like parts of proteins, presumably those near or embedded within cell membranes. The first real stab at explaining the “how” of anesthetics, as opposed to just the “where”, has now been taken by Turin and his colleagues Efthimios Skoulakis and Andrew Horsfield. Their new work, just published in PNAS, suggests that volatile anesthetics operate by perturbing the internal electronic structure of proteins. This would lead to changes in electron currents in those proteins, in cells, and in the organism. They don’t just theorize about these effects, they actually measure the electron currents in anesthetized flies using a technique known as electron spin resonance (often called electron paramagnetic resonance). ESR is similar to nuclear magnetic resonance, the techno-phenomenon at heart of the modern MRI machine. The main difference is that in ESR excited electron spins are measured instead of proton resonance. Typically, microwaves are applied in the presence of a magnetic field to a sample (or whole organism) inside the resonator cavity of an ESR spectrometer. An ESR signal is diagnostic of unpaired electrons, which exist only in certain cellular structures. One particularly strong signal for example, is that of melanin, which can be accounted for in experiments by comparisons with mutants lacking normal melanin content.What Turin and colleagues have shown is that the total amount of free electron spins in fruit flies increases when they are exposed to general anaesthetics. The amount of free spins generated during anesthesia is independent of melanin content and far larger than any signal previously measured from free radicals which are the other source of spin. These are normally very unstable and undetectable in the absence of “spin traps” to capture them. Furthermore, mutants of Drosophila which have been selected for resistance to certain anesthetics show a reduced, sometimes absent spin signal. Citation: Electron spin changes as a general mechanism for general anesthesia? (2014, August 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-08-electron-mechanism-anesthesia.html Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org) —How does consciousness work? Few questions if any could be more profound. One thing we do know about it, jokes biophysicist Luca Turin, is that it is soluble in chloroform. When you put the brain into chloroform, the lipids that form nerve cell membranes and the myelin that insulates them will dissolve. On the other hand, when you put chloroform into the brain, by inhaling it, consciousness dissolves. It is hard to imagine a satisfying explanation of consciousness that does not also account for how anesthetics like chloroform can abolish it. Effect of the anesthetic noble gas Xenon on the electronic structure of two short peptides. Top: the highest occupied molecular orbital [HOMO, purple surface ] for two 9-residue helices positioned close to each other. A small fraction of the HOMO extends from one helix to the other. Bottom: when a Xenon atom [gold sphere] is in the gap, the orbital spread increases. Transparent surface is Van der Waals electron density. Credit Luca Turin More information: Electron spin changes during general anesthesia in Drosophila, PNAS, www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1404387111 Common brain processes of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness identified © 2014 Phys.org Why did Turin and his musketeers try the experiment in the first place? Some of Turin’s most alluring science has been a side effect of his passion for perfume. While not intending to become the fly whisperer that he is today, Turin was able to use these creatures to demonstrate detection of odorants by molecular vibrations. The key mechanism here, and link to anesthetics, is the concept of inelastic electron tunneling, i.e, an electron current that takes place within the receptor proteins in the presence of odorants. To account for the fact that a very broad class of compounds act as volatile anesthetics the researchers propose a unitary mechanism for their action involving electrons. They note that the smallest among them, Xenon (Xe), presents a puzzle to chemical theories of anesthetic action. Xe is a wonderful (if expensive) anesthetic but it has no biologically relevant chemistry to speak of— it is completely inert. Furthermore, it persists as a perfect sphere of electron density and so is devoid of any possibly interesting shape. However, as Turin and colleagues point out, “Xe has physics”. In particular, it can conduct electrons, as the IBM researchers who first used a scanning tunneling microscope to write the company’s logo in Xe atoms found out.To see whether this property would apply to all anesthetics, and not just Xe, Turin used a modeling technique called density functional theory to show that Xe and other anesthetics effect the highest occupied molecular orbit (HOMO) of the alpha helices common to membrane proteins. The HOMO level for organic molecules or semiconductors is analogous to what the valence band maximum is to inorganic semiconductors. Intriguingly, while all the anesthetics were found to extend the alpha helix HOMO level, similar molecules with strong convulsant effects on the brain, but no anesthetic effects, had the smallest HOMO effect. These results offer a fascinating insight into how anesthetics may be operating and raise many important new questions. Would spin changes be able to explain, for example, the observation that deeply anesthetized tadpoles (a favorite animal model in anesthesia research) can be quickly returned to normal activity just by subjected them to a sobering pressure pulse of 50 bars? Are the cessation of consciousness and the apparent concomitment abolishment of spikes both mere epiphenomena of underlying material reorganizations that result from spin changes? In other words, anesthetics may eliminate the wherewithall for spikes but is that the effect that is really eliminating the conscious state?Other researchers, in particular those who investigate the solitary acoustic wave nature of spikes, report that the melting point of membranes is lowered by anesthetics while hydrostatic pressure increases it—ostensibly due to latent volume changes. A rectification of these more global thermodynamic intuitions with lower level physics and chemistry of electron conduction awaits. The work of Turin and his collegues breathes refreshing new life into a field whose increasingly beleaguered explanations of yore (like simplistic effects on ion channels) have now started to crumble under the weight of their own exceptions.last_img read more

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Awarding Excellence

first_imgHigher education is very important as it acts as the stepping stone after school education. Keeping the glorious legacy intact on its 19th year of existence and with the aim of reinventing education in management studies under the dynamic leadership of  Pankaj Agarwal, vice chairman and strategic stewardship of Dr Urvashi Makkar, Director General, GL Bajaj Institute of Management & research (GLBIMR), has been recently awarded with number of prestigious awards. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The first award conferred to the institute is Top B School for Excellence in Education by CSR.Apart for that, GLBIMR has also been bestowed with Best B School in Industry Interface (North India) award by Dialogue India in 2016 along with Eminent Director of Leading Institute of India Award by CSR in 2016. With a focus to provide global exposure and create a benchmark of delivering quality management education, GLBIMR Greater Noida, has collaborated with two internationally acclaimed corporate leaders as the adjunct faculty members. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe institute has also empanelled Dr Alain Boge-a reputed international faculty who has visited many recognised universities of Asia and Europe. Dr Alain, Professor at University of Jean Moulin Roubaix (France), who previously worked as the CEO at BGM Internationals, will be conducting 30-hours module on International Business. Ashish Patel, a distinguished financial expert, Director- Morgan Franklin Consulting (Washington D.C, USA), formerly senior vice president in the Bank of America, has been roped in as an adjunct faculty to conduct extensive 30-hours module on Strategic Management.last_img read more

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