Daily news from New Zealand – 26 September – Video

first_imgWELLINGTON, NEW ZEALAND – SEPTEMBER 17: Morne Steyn of the Springboks lines up a kick at goal during the IRB 2011 Rugby World Cup Pool D match between South Africa and Fiji at Wellington Regional Stadium on September 17, 2011 in Wellington, New Zealand. (Photo by Alex Livesey/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Morne Steyn is currently the top point scorer at the World CupThe Rugby World Cup 2011 official YouTube channel will be releasing daily videos to give you the chance to be part of the experience no matter where you are in the world. It allows you to follow the progress of the tournament, plus look at other things to do while in New Zealand.In today’s RWC Daily we have reaction from Wales’ victory against Namibia and look ahead to Japan’s match with Canada. We also have all the latest news and go on tour with the Grange School from Chile in New Zealand.Plus Wayne ‘Buck’ Shelford answers your questions – What drove you to become a number 8?center_img 25 September | 24 September | 23 September | 22 September | 21 Septemberlast_img read more

Details

Rugby Rant: ‘Forwards rugby’ a drab spectacle

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS By Luke WalpoleTHE SIGHT of two colossal packs throwing the proverbial kitchen sink at each other is becoming all too common in the northern hemisphere.This year’s Six Nations was far from vintage viewing, setting records for all the wrong reasons: it had the fewest number of tries ever scored (37) and a tries-per-match average of 2.47 – the first time the figure has fallen below three. England scored only one try after the first weekend, yet finished runners-up.Compare that to the halcyon days of 2005 when there were 71 tries at an average of 4.73 a game and it certainly paints a bleak picture.So what’s changed? Well, at the elite level the sport has become fixated on breeding behemoths rather than rewarding skill and ability, a criticism that can be levelled at both forwards and backs. This war of attrition that coaches have signed up to creates mostly dull matches – and fans won’t tolerate it for long. For proof, remember how Saracens supporters booed their own team for negative play in 2009, despite the club being top of the Premiership at the time. Loosening the shackles will improve the players’ skills, increase spectator numbers and create a buzz around the sport. A win-win-win scenario, surely?This was published in the September 2013 edition of Rugby World. Click here to see what’s in the current issue.center_img Coaches seem to be missing a trick. As a warm-blooded Saxon this next claim is hard to stomach, but I believe we should learn from the Aussies. Down Under, union isn’t a main sport, and its fight to attract punters has seen them play an attractive, expansive style.In the Premiership there is so much attacking talent – Kyle Eastmond and Christian Wade to name but two – so it’s senseless to kick for the corners in open play and let the forwards monopolise the match. Purists may disagree and cite that old cliché ‘Forwards decide who wins, backs decide by how many’, but the current climate is suffocating creativity.The whole sporting scenery is saturated, so rugby must try to stand out. Attacking rugby attracts new fans. Although the economic benefit is tangible, the other benefit is more visceral – the more vibrant atmosphere that bigger crowds bring. Even the purists can’t scoff at that.last_img read more

Details

New season SuperBru predictions!

first_img We have worked with SuperBru to bring you another season of pitting your wits against other Rugby World readers, proving you’re more than a tad clairvoyant and more than a little familiar with the ins and outs of the Premiership and Pro12.To give you something to pit your wits against (and laugh at), our team have put their heads together for this opening week and offered some preditions. Here they are by competition.Aviva PremiershipHere are our predictions for the Aviva Premiership SuperBru pool, round one.Northampton versus Gloucester: Saints by 3Sale versus Bath: Sale by 5Saracens versus Wasps: Sarries by 8Leicester versus Newcastle: Tigers by 16London Irish versus Harlequins: Quins by 13London Welsh versus Exeter: Chiefs by 6 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Zebre versus Cardiff Blues: Cardiff Blues by 16To read our extensive previews for the Premiership and Pro12, check out our October issue of Rugby World! Find out how to download it here. A new season beckons: The teams, players and fans are good to go – so what are your predictions? center_img A new season is here, with all new players, conditions and club rumours to influence your pub predictions. So start your guessing! Glad to be back: the Guinness Pro12 sides are ready for a tough season (courtesy of INPHO)Guinness Pro12Here are our predictions for the Guinness Pro12 SuperBru pool, round one.Munster versus Edinburgh: Munster by 11Ospreys versus Treviso: Ospreys by 12Scarlets versus Ulster: Scarlets by 4Connacht versus Dragons: DrawGlasgow versus Leinster: Glasgow by 6last_img read more

Details

Hotshots: Cardiff Blues scrum-half Tomos Williams

first_imgRW Verdict: A quick and brave player, who outfoxes opponents with his unpredictable play, Williams is improving all the time. Expect this bright spark from the Valleys to shine for the Blues in the 2015-16 season. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Coming through: Tomos Williams attacks for Wales at the 2015 Hong Kong Sevens. (Photo: Getty Images) TAGS: Cardiff Blues First published in the July 2015 edition of Rugby World magazine.center_img When did you start playing rugby?With Treorchy U7. One of my brothers was there and my old man (Steve Williams) was a coach. He coached us all the way up until youth, then I had a couple of games for Treorchy firsts, then went to Cardiff Blues U18 and signed an academy contract when I was 18.Have you played different positions?I have always been a scrum-half. I like it there because you are always involved.When did you first play for Wales?I went to South Africa with the U18s two years ago, then I played for the U20s last season and this. U20 rugby is a lot quicker and it has improved my skills a lot.And you have played for Wales Sevens for the last two seasons… Yes. I was with them for a lot of this year, at Gold Coast, South Africa and Dubai. It’s good to go to all these places – a different experience again.Who were your mentors?My old man, and Clive Jones, who was my coach at Coleg y Cymoedd.How do you think Wales will do in the U20 World Championship?We’ve got a tough group (France, England and Japan) but I think we can push on and do well. It was a good experience playing in New Zealand for a month at last year’s World Championship. We should have done better (Wales finished seventh). What are your aims for next season?I am full-time with the Blues now. I had a couple of LV= Cup matches for them this season but I was with the Wales teams for most of the year. Next season I want to havea couple of starts for the Blues first team, if I can, and push on with them. Date of birth: 1 January, 1995. Country: Waleslast_img read more

Details

How to make it as a sports journalist: Stephen Jones

first_img+ “Realise that if you are dedicated enough then the dream can be fulfilled.” “The job of a correspondent is to have opinions. Get off the fence every single time. Occasionally you might do it to provoke a reaction, if you get a nasty reaction then that is our fault, so opinions are huge for me. Whether they wind people up the wrong way is another matter, but I have developed a thick skin and I’m going to continue down the path I have set for myself and that is to say exactly what I think… but I am not slaughtering people week in, week out and I also enjoy writing about someone I really enjoy watching.”How does your role differ to that of your colleagues working on daily newspapers?“You have got to be careful working for a Sunday. If I say on a Monday I’ve got a great news story there are five days for your daily competitors to come up with it themselves and scupper you. So the key for a Sunday paper is to work out what has still got legs for a Sunday morning.”How do you rate the ‘state of the union’?“Sometimes you have got to ignore us old whingers because the sport is about 10 times the size of what it was! There used to be just eight members of the International Board and now there are 120 or whatever. You see things like the Spanish Cup Final attracting 35,000 or 40,000 going to games in Madagascar.In demand: Rugby has grown exponentially in the media in recent years“The game is on the rise in South America, rugby is crossing barriers in places like Rwanda and you hear there is an Iranian women’s team. Rugby does so much, then there’s the Olympics, it is monstrous. Rugby has grown like a forest fire and I cannot believe that any sport has grown so widely and so rapidly.”Stephen Jones’ top tips for a career in sports journalism:+ “Publish a blog on a regular basis – even if only five people read them at first”+ “You have got to grab people’s attention.”+ “Don’t make them too long – restrict yourself to 750 words and have the discipline to get all your thoughts in.”+ “Start at the end, not the beginning, if you are doing apiece that says is Dylan Hartley the man to captain England, then you conclude at the very start, you say Dylan Hartley is the very man and then justify yourself.”+ “Whoever you meet, even if it is a bloke in the street and you chat for two minutes,  keep every single contact in your contacts book – that is absolutely vital.”Strong opinions: The newspapers can still provoke strong reactions and influence people+ “Find your own heroes and make sure you are listening when they are speaking.”+ “Stay close to the media…go into WH Smith and see the huge range of magazines that there are, stay up with local and national radio, TV, newspapers”+ “Get on Twitter – if you’re not already”+ “Get in touch with people, don’t be afraid to write to the editors of the big papers.” By Graham JenkinsWelcome to The Forward Pass, a series of conversations with leading rugby union journalists, broadcasters, presenters and photographers who will offer the next generation of media professionals – and fans – an insight into how they cover the sport.The latest industry veteran to join host Graham Jenkins to reflect on his career journey, discuss the key decisions he has made along the way and share how he approaches his job is Sunday Times rugby correspondent and author Stephen Jones.Read extracts from the podcast and listen to the complete conversation below.Where did your rugby journey begin“My love of the sport came from my dad, he was a flanker at our local club in Newport and when he retired we would go down to watch Newport and the magic started there – and not just the magic of rugby but the magic of club rugby and what it meant to the community, because you sort of owned the team then.”And your passion for writing?“It was very much a passion for newspapers, I can remember when I was about 9 or 10, reading the big rugby paper The Western Mail and realising that these people were covering rugby, in fact it wasn’t a rugby thing or even a sports thing, I just wanted to be a newspaper journalist – the sports thing was just a lucky add on.“We’re talking about a time that when you licked your fingers the newspaper print would come off in your hands. It was a fairly basic addiction to newspapers.”Who had the greatest influence on you as a writer?“There was a very famous writer called Bryn Thomas who wrote under the by-line J.B.G Thomas. I was lucky to meet him later, I think he wrote something like 24 books and he covered all the Lions tours. He would go on Lions tours on these great Dakota aircraft and there would be dinner and drinks every night where they would have to put on their dinner jackets. It was the great era of touring and these heroic old guys gave me an almost rapturous vision of what could be.“Journalistically you tend to follow columnists, the likes of Ian Wooldridge, Hugh McIlvanney, my colleague at the Sunday Times, if anyone ever wants to be a sports journalist Hugh has done compendiums on boxing, racing, football – just the most muscular beauty in those books.”Decorated: In a forty-year career Stephen Jones (right) has won many awardsWhere did your first break come?“I must have written about 80 letters to every local newspaper you could think of, I think I even wrote to one on the Isle of Skye, asking to be taken on but didn’t get any joy whatsoever.“Then one day a friend of mine showed me Rugby World magazine and in there was an advert for a really basic journalism post – editorial assistant. It said you must be willing to learn sub-editing and picture filing, the salary was unbelievably basic as well but I applied and I got it…it was a perfect grounding.”“While I was at Rugby World I would go and do match reports for the Sunday Times as a freelance and that was where the link to the Sunday Times initially came. Every Wednesday morning the letter would come asking you to go and do this match and say how many words they wanted. I would sit by my front door waiting for the post to come because I as so thrilled and overwhelmed that I would get from the Sunday Times and have a by-line.”How have relationships with players changed?“You still have players you know well and can chat to in most teams but in general the whole thing is media managed. You have to have 10 minutes with a player, you get shipped out and someone else comes in. We are missing all the vividness and colour and characters we used to have in the old days.”Holding court: Eddie Jones talks to the written press in AustraliaDo you enjoy generating a reaction? Melee: Martin Johnson is swamped during the 2011 Rugby World Cup center_img After a distinguished career as a rugby journalist, the Sunday Times rugby correspondent Stephen Jones gives his tips on making it in the industry LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Details

Biggest Six Nations Controversies

first_img 2021 Six Nations Referees Six Nations Fixtures 2022 The 2022 Six Nations… Expand The game was eventually played three weeks later, with the sides grinding out a 17-17 draw – Tommy Bowe scoring a brace.The 100-minute matchLate return: Rabah Slimani came back on in the match against Wales (Getty Images)The middle of the decade was fairly uneventful – until France played Wales in Paris in 2017. Wales led 18-13 thanks to the boot of Leigh Halfpenny, were exhausted from a mammoth defensive effort and the clock was ticking into its final moments.France claimed that their prop, Uini Atonio, was suffering from a suspected concussion so he was taken off for an HIA and replaced by Rabah Slimani, their best scrummager, in the closing minutes.The Wales coaches, particularly Rob Howley, were apoplectic at this, a mood which only worsened when Welsh tighthead Samson Lee was sin-binned after duelling with Slimani.Lee’s replacement Tomas Francis was slow to come on the pitch and the clock kept ticking remorselessly on. France kept winning penalties, choosing to scrum and failing to batter their way over. Eventually Damien Chouly forced his way over and Camille Lopez knocked over the simple conversion to win the match by two points – in the 100th minute.An investigation was later launched to look at the substitution of Atonio but found there was “no clear evidence that there was any intent to obtain a competitive advantage in the match”. Six Nations Venues Who are the referees, touch judges and TMO’s… Conor O’Shea’s ‘anti-rugby’England’s 2017 game against Italy seemed as if it would present no real stumbling block for the men in white, who were undefeated under Eddie Jones.However, Conor O’Shea and Brendan Venter came up with a cunning plan to ensure that the game would not go all England’s way and the Italians were rewarded with a 10-5 half-time lead.The visitors decided to not commit any numbers to the ruck, meaning that without a player from each team present, no breakdown was formed and so the offside line disappeared. Scrum-half Edoardo Gori disrupted the channel between nine and ten, as Danny Care at times seemed utterly confounded by the Italian tactics as pass after pass was disrupted by the rampant Azzurri.England players asked referee Roman Poite for some explanation of what was transpiring, only for Poite to give the immortal reply: “I am sorry. I am a referee, not a coach.”England would go on to win comfortably, but coach  Jones was furious, claiming that “the whole game became a joke” and telling spectators to “ask for your money back”.Concussion confusionTrading places: Antoine Dupont and Maxime Machenaud (Getty Images)France and Ireland’s 2018 meeting is best known for Johnny Sexton’s incredible last-gasp drop-goal. But there was also talk about more French concussion subterfuge.Scrum-half Antoine Dupont went down having injured his right knee late in the game, but when referee Nigel Owens stopped the game, he indicated there was a suspected head injury.It was the independent match-day doctor who indicated that Dupont would be going off for an HIA and this allowed France to bring on a specialist scrum-half for the closing minutes having already used all their replacements.Maxime Machenaud came back on and France won a penalty from a scrum. Anthony Belleau missed the kick, though, setting the stage for Sexton’s Paris party trick.Another investigation was launched but again no wrongdoing was found with the decision to call for an HIA “not made by anyone who was formally connected with the French team”. Six Nations Fixtures 2022 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS We give the lowdown on the six venues… Here Jacob Whitehead looks at the biggest controversies to take place during the Six Nations. Six Nations Table 2021 Six Nations Fixtures 2022 2021 Six Nations Referees Follow our Six Nations homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Who is leading the way in the Six… Collapse Six Nations Table 2021 Biggest Six Nations ControversiesThe Six Nations is nearly back. Every team will be resetting to an extent from the Rugby World Cup, but not all discussion will focus on the sides’ performances on the pitch…Controversy never seems to be far away from the Six Nations, with grudges being renewed each and every year. When teams know each other so well, the margins can often be miniscule, and so the smallest edge can prove pivotal. With that in mind, here is Rugby World’s guide to Six Nations controversy…Martin Johnson’s red carpet receptionTalking point: Martin Johnson talks to match officials during the red-carpet controversy (Getty Images)Clive Woodward’s England team were one of the first sides to embrace the philosophy of marginal gains.Ireland traditionally had a lucky left side of the red carpet at Lansdowne Road for when the anthems were sung, but Martin Johnson, claiming ignorance, lined up on the wrong side ahead of the final game of the 2003 championship. Ireland resolutely lined up to their opponent’s left but this led to insufficient red carpet for the dignitaries.Irish officials tried to convince Johnson to move, but the England captain refused, later claiming he’d only have shifted if asked by the referee.Irish President Mary McAleese was forced to get her shoes muddy while England didn’t take a backwards step all game. They went on to win 42-6 in a virtuoso performance, claiming the Grand Slam.Game over for WalesCalling time: Wales captain Gareth Thomas in discussions with referee Chris Whtie at the end of the match (Getty Images)It’s a shame that this controversy overshadowed what should have been a great moment in Six Nations history, namely Italy’s second ever win over Wales and the first time they’d ever won two matches in the same tournament.In their 2007 meeting Wales led deep into the second half, but a Ramiro Pez penalty and Mauro Bergamasco’s 77th-minute try gave the Azzurri belief. Wales had one more shot, as a penalty was awarded to them in the Italian half.Referee Craig White indicated to James Hook that there was time to kick to touch, before shocking the Welsh by blowing the full-time whistle after the fly-half set up a lineout close to the Italian line. White apologised after the match, but it would prove to be little solace for a bemused Wales.Questionable quick lineoutsFour years later in 2011, Wales were the beneficiaries of controversy as the match officials missed an illegal lineout for the crucial score.Wales hadn’t won a home match in seven, but clinical goalkicking brought them to within a point of a Brian O’Driscoll-inspired Ireland. Ronan O’Gara mishit a clearance kick to send the ball out on the full, and Welsh captain Matthew Rees sprinted to the halfway line to mark the spot.A ball-boy presented the hooker with a new ball, which he flung to scrum-half Mike Phillips, who outsprinted Tommy Bowe to score in the corner.The problem was that laws dictate a quick lineout can only be taken with the same ball and providing that it had not been touched by another person. Neither condition was met and Ireland’s chances of winning the championship disappeared into the Cardiff night.Frozen out in FranceCold front: Heaters could not defrost the Stade de France pitch in time for kick-off (Getty Images)Ireland had another reason to be aggrieved in 2012, as their game against France was controversially postponed due to a frozen pitch.It was the first time since 1985 that adverse weather conditions had caused such a delay. Referee Dave Pearson only made the call ten minutes before kick-off, angering a crowd who were sitting in temperatures of -5C, with a wind chill of -11C.The Stade de France pitch does not have undersoil heating, leading many to ask why the game wasn’t played earlier than 9pm, with Paris bathed in winter sunshine earlier in the day. Expand Six Nations Venues Expand Also make sure you know about the Fixtures, Injuries, Table, Venues, TV Coverage by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagramlast_img read more

Details

Top Try-Scorer In The 2020 Six Nations

first_img Six Nations Venues We give the lowdown on the six venues… Top Try-Scorer In The 2020 Six NationsTries win matches and the players that score the most are a valuable commodity when it comes to international competitions like the Six Nations.Below we have some names to look out for during the five weeks of action.England – Jonny MayThe 2019 Six Nations leading try-scorer is hard to bet against especially given how proficient he is at finishing chances.Wales – Josh AdamsThe 2019 Rugby World Cup leading try-scorer has made a habit of crossing the whitewash with regularity. In just 21 Welsh appearances he has crossed 13 times.Ireland – Jacob StockdaleHe may have struggled at the World Cup but Stockdale knows where the try-line is as shown by his seven tries in the 2018 Six Nations.France – Teddy ThomasThomas is currently the bookies favourite in terms of the top try-scorer for France.Scotland – Sean MaitlandScotland are looking to bounce back from a dour World Cup and Maitland could be one to watch in the exciting back-line.Italy – Michele CampagnaroItaly may struggle to score tries but Campagnaro’s ability to play across the back-line could see him pop up with tries.Top Try-Scorer In The 2020 Six NationsUpdated Standings Josh Adams – 3Charles Ollivon – 3 Six Nations Fixtures 2022 Six Nations Table 2021 Expand Dominant World Cup: Josh Adams scored the most tries at the 2019 World Cup (Getty Images) Collapse Six Nations Venues Six Nations Fixtures 2022center_img Jonny May – 2Vincent Rattez – 1Jonny Sexton – 1George North – 1Nick Tompkins – 1Previous Top Try Scorers In The Six Nations2019 – Jonny May – England (6)2018 – Jacob Stockdale – Ireland (7)2017 – Eight players tied (3)2016 – George North – Wales (4)2015 – Jonathan Joseph – England (4)2014 – Two players tied (4)2013 – Alex Cuthbert – Wales (4)2012 – Tommy Bowe – Ireland (5)2011 – Chris Ashton – England (6)2010 – Four players tied (3) Who is leading the way in the Six… Expand LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Six Nations Table 2021 Stay up to date with the try scorer standings for the 2020 Six Nations here. Six Nations Fixtures 2022 The 2022 Six Nations… Follow our Six Nations homepage which we update regularly with news and features.Also make sure you know about the Fixtures, Injuries, Table, Venues, TV Coverage by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagramlast_img read more

Details

Six Nations Scotland v Italy Preview

first_imgAll the big team news, key issues and TV details you need for the Six Nations match between Scotland and Italy Stuart Hogg and Duhan Van Der Merwe tackle Italy centre Federico Mori (Getty Images) Six Nations Scotland v Italy PreviewIt’s a case of screaming “Everyone remain calm!” while fires are extinguished, 5G masts are erected again and politicians are allowed out of their underground bunkers. Stuart Hogg is starting at fly-half for Scotland.In October against Wales, Hogg had to slot in at ten for a stint and after the game he reportedly joked that he would prefer to stay at 15. At the team unveiling for this Italy encounter, his coach Gregor Townsend said with a smile: “He said he was misquoted! He said to me the next day that wasn’t what he meant…”Related: Stuart Hogg starts at fly-half for the first time for ScotlandFor some sage fans who have been calling for this for a while, convinced that fly-half is truly Hogg’s best position and that he has been held back for years, it’s time to see if the tin foil cap fits. For the rest of us, it’s time to see if Scotland can click again, just like they did against England and in spells against Wales. Because against Ireland last week, there was a lot of spluttering and hoping chaos could win the match for them.How Italy would love some chaos. It has been all too predictable for them these Six Nations: turn up, relent to the opposition, traipse home. Loss after loss. For every punch of fine attacking intent, for every plunging run from Monty Ioane, their defence has had all the integrity of loose custard. Their points difference in this tournament currently stands at -142. Juan Ignacio Brex gets stuck in at ruck time (Getty Images)What have the coaches said?Gregor Townsend said of Stuart Hogg’s move to ten: “We’re keen to see him play there if he’s going to be, at times, a reserve ten in our squad.“Full-back is his position but given his experience, leadership ability and all-round skillset we do see him as being able to cover other positions and this is an opportunity for him to do that.”Italy head coach Franco Smith said: “We have a big challenge ahead of us. Our work during the week was excellent. We want to win on Saturday, closing the Championship in the best possible way and continuing on the path of becoming more and more competitive.”What are the odds?Scotland are overwhelming favourites, with odds of 1-66 on Bet365. Italy are rated at 16-1 and a draw comes in at 66-1.If you fancy having a flutter, Bet365 have a welcome bonus of up to £100 in Bet Credits.Minimum deposit £5. Bet Credits available for use upon settlement of bets to value of qualifying deposit. Minimum odds, bet and payment method exclusions apply. Returns exclude Bet Credits stake. Time limits and T&Cs apply.Over-18s only. BeGambleAware.The talismanic Hamish Watson (Getty Images)Any interesting statistics?Italy have now lost 31 Six Nations matches in a row.Scotland lost six lineouts against Ireland.Italy’s last win in this competition – against Scotland in 2015 – came courtesy a late penalty try.Scotland have a tackle success rate of 92%  in the 2021 Six Nations – the best of any side in the competition.Italy have not missed a single penalty kick yet in the 2021 Six Nations – Scotland have missed three.Hamish Watson is yet to miss a tackle in these Six Nations (he has made 44 tackles).Italy currently have a points difference in the Six Nations table of -142. Scotland’s is +1.The last time these two met in the Six Nations at Murrayfield, the attendance was 67,144.What time does it kick off and is it on TV?Scotland vs Italy, Saturday 20 March, Murrayfield.The match kicks off at 2.155pm and will be shown on BBC One in the UK and in Ireland on Virgin Media One. You can listen to coverage on BBC Radio Scotland.Pascal Gaüzère (France) is the match referee, and he will be assisted by Karl Dickson (England) and Ben Whitehouse (Wales), while Alex Ruiz (France) the TMO.What are the line-ups?Scotland: Sean Maitland; Darcy Graham, Huw Jones, Sam Johnson, Duhan van der Merwe; Stuart Hogg (captain), Scott Steele; Rory Sutherland, David Cherry, Zander Fagerson, Sam Skinner, Grant Gilchrist, Jamie Ritchie, Hamish Watson, Matt Fagerson.Replacements: George Turner, Jamie Bhatti, Simon Berghan, Alex Craig, Nick Haining, Ali Price, Jaco van der Walt, Chris Harris.Italy: Edoardo Padovani; Mattia Bellini, Juan Ignacio Brex, Federico Mori, Monty Ioane; Paolo Garbisi, Stephen Varney; Danilo Fischetti, Luca Bigi (captain), Marco Riccioni, Niccolò Cannone, Federico Ruzza, Sebastian Negri, Johan Meyer, Michele Lamaro.Replacements: Gianmarco Lucchesi, Andrea Lovotti, Giosuè Zilocchi, Riccardo Favretto, Maxime Mbanda, Marcello Violi, Carlo Canna, Marco Zanon. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS But it doesn’t have to be like this.Through injuries, falling form, and Townsend’s inherent need to see if the selection grass is greener, Scotland are sporting some jazzy new combinations. Up front that means some practical changes. Against the Irish, Scotland’s lineout functioned like a local council before the bailiffs arrived. They lost six of their own throws.The hope is that new front-liner Dave Cherry will be far less wasteful than last week’s starters as he throws at incoming locks Sam Skinner and Grant Gilchrist. Italy will have seen how Ireland took to the collisions, too.Out the back, though, it’s attacking intent for the Scots. It’s wild to say out loud, but if you count Scott Steele’s time on the wing on his debut against Wales, plus Huw Jones’s time at full-back for Glasgow, and Hogg starting here at ten, it’s a backline of back-three players. The hope is that with front-foot ball, Scotland will sprint through Italian turnstiles.Italy cannot be so charitable. They mustn’t be. They have an horrific run of defeats in this competition (31 and counting) to end. And all the talk of rebuilding and starting again must at least show something for all the obvious endeavour of the players. Having more experience with Edo Padovani at full-back could help. Having their new centre-axis could change the picture again further.Maybe an intercept try, for old time’s sake? A classic chaotic game between these two should always have one of those…Scotland skipper Stuart Hogg will get more touches (Getty Images)What’s the big team news?Gregor Townsend has made seven personnel changes to Scotland’s starting XV for their Six Nations match against Italy.Finn Russell is ruled out following a brain injury against Ireland, so captain Hogg moves to fly-half with Sean Maitland starting at full-back.Darcy Graham starts on the wing while outside centre Huw Jones comes in for Chris Harris and Scott Steele is picked ahead of Ali Price at scrum-half.In the forwards, hooker Dave Cherry gets his first start of the Six Nations, prop Zander Fagerson returns from his lengthy ban and locks Sam Skinner and Grant Gilchrist come in for Scott Cummings and Jonny Gray because of injury.Italy have made four changes. In the backs, Edo Padovani starts at full-back with the green Jacopo Trulla gone, while Federico Mori comes in at 13 for Carlo Canna, to partner the industrious Juan Ignacio Brex.Up front, prop Marco Riccioni returns to the starting XV, replacing Giosuè Zilocchi, and Federico Ruzza starts at lock with David Sisi out.last_img read more

Details

European Champions Cup live stream: How to watch from anywhere

first_imgEuropean Champions Cup live stream: How to watch from FranceTo watch the Champions Cup in France, beIN Sports is the place to go as they are the rights holders and will show every game live.beIN Sports offersCertain matches are also available on free-to-air FR2, including La Rochelle v Sale Sharks (kick-off 4pm French time) on Saturday 10 April and Clermont Auvergne v Toulouse (kick-off 4pm) on Sunday 11 April this weekend.European Champions Cup live stream: How to watch from elsewhere in EuropeTelefonica has the rights to show the Champions Cup in Spain and Andorra, Sport TV in Portugal and GO in Malta.European Champions Cup live stream: How to watch from the USAIf you live in the States, the official broadcaster of Champions Cup matches is NBC, with matches streamed on Peacock Premium, which is available for $4.99 a month.Get Peacock Premium How to watch the European Champions Cup from outside your countryIf you’re abroad, but still want to watch your local Champions Cup coverage, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network.VPNs allow you to get around any geo-blocking by changing your IP address so you appear in a different location and can watch the same legal Champions Cup live stream you would at home.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPN and recommend ExpressVPN, which is easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs.Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free.Check out ExpressVPN All the details you need to watch the quarter-finals in Europe’s elite competition Clermont host Toulouse in the last quarter-final (AFP/Getty Images) European Champions Cup live stream: How to watch from AustraliaFor those in Australia, beIN Sports now has the rights to show European Champions Cup matches in 2020-21.You can also stream beIN Sports’ coverage live and on-demand through Kayo Sports. A basic package is $25 a month and premium is $35 a month – and they offer a FREE 14-day trial to new customers.Kayo Sports offer Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. European Champions Cup live stream: How to watch matches online from anywhereEuropean Champions Cup quarter-finals weekend is here!After the cancellation of the second block of pool matches in January, the 2020-21 competition moved directly into knockout stages with a round of 16 last weekend and now it’s time for the quarter-finals.Related: European Champions Cup fixturesBT Sport will be showing every Champions Cup knockout match live in the UK and Ireland while there is also one game on free-to-air TV each weekend.There are broadcasters all over the world showing Champions Cup matches live and in those territories where there isn’t a broadcast deal, EPCR now have an OTT platform to deliver live coverage themselves.Below are details of how to find a reliable Champions Cup live stream wherever you are.center_img European Champions Cup live stream: How to watch from the UK & IrelandBT Sport has the rights to show the Champions Cup in the UK and Ireland, and are showing every match in the knockout stages.If you don’t have a BT contract but want to watch the competition, don’t worry because you can still easily watch it online. That’s because BT Sport has a contract-free monthly pass that allows you to get instant access to all four of their sport channels for just £25.Get a BT Sport Monthly PassIf you’re from the UK but are overseas when there is a particular match you want to watch, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – see the information above.In the UK, Channel 4 show one match a round on free-to-air television while Virgin Media One in Ireland do the same. In the quarter-finals, La Rochelle v Sale Sharks (kick-off 3pm) on Saturday 10 April is live on both channels. European Champions Cup live stream: How to watch from New ZealandSky Sport NZ has the rights to show the Champions Cup in the Land of the Long White Cloud, with the first two quarter-finals (early hours of Sunday NZ time) on Sky Sport 4 and the second two (early hours of Monday NZ time) on Sky Sport 1.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99) but if you sign up for 12 months before 30 June 2021 you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offer We recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing.  European Champions Cup live stream: How to watch from South AfricaSuperSport has the rights to broadcast the Champions Cup in South Africa and it is showing all four quarter-finals live.There are various DStv packages available that give access to SuperSport.European Champions Cup live stream: How to watch from South-East AsiaAgain, beIN Sports has the broadcast rights for European rugby in Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and other South-East Asia countries.European Champions Cup live stream: How to watch from the CaribbeanIn the Caribbean, SportsMax is where to head to watch Champions Cup matches.European Champions Cup live stream: How to watch from elsewhereEPCR have launched an OTT service, epcrugby.tv, so you can stream live Challenge Cup matches outside of its core broadcast territories (UK & Ireland, France, USA, Malta, Spain, Andorra, Portugal, Malta, Australia and Sub-Saharan Africa).It’s €19.99 for a weekend pass, which allows you to watch all Champions Cup and Challenge Cup quarter-finals.Find out more about epcrugby.tv LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Details

‘Acompañantes’ en ambos lados de la tumba

first_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Por Pat McCaughanPosted Nov 2, 2012 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA [Episcopal News Service] El hermano Ron Fender pasará el 1 y el 2 de noviembre, las fiestas de Todos los Santos y de los Fieles Difuntos [respectivamente], recordando a los desamparados y a los muertos que nadie reclama, primero adornando sus tumbas con flores y, un día después, con una comida y una Eucaristía.Si bien la conmemoración de los muertos en la Iglesia Episcopal es una tradición de larga data, la de Fender se cuenta entre un creciente número de ministerios comunitarios que “acompañan” a los pobres, los desamparados, las personas marginadas y solas, en ambos lados de la tumba.Como  asesor de la Cocina Comunitaria de Chattanooga, Fender, monje de la Hermandad Episcopal de San Gregorio [Episcopal Brotherhood of St. Gregory] brinda toda una gama de servicios a las personas sin hogar, entre ellos el celebrar una vigilia con los moribundos y también darles sepultura.El ministerio surgió “poco después de que yo llegué aquí”, recordaba él durante una reciente entrevista telefónica desde su oficina. “Uno de los hombres sin hogar sufrió un colapso aquí en la cocina y dejó de respirar. Le dimos resucitación cardiopulmonar, lo llevamos al hospital y allí lo pusieron en ventilación asistida. Pero después de algunas horas, los médicos me llamaron y me preguntaron si él tenía familia.“Yo sabía que no tenía porque él me había dicho muchas veces que estaba solo en el mundo y le preocupaba que no hubiera nadie para enterrarlo”, recordaba Fender. “El médico me dijo, ‘en verdad debemos dejarlo partir’. Comenzaron a desconectarle todo. Yo estuve junto a él hasta el fin.Con esa muerte me di cuenta de que “yo no quería que ninguno de ellos muriera solo y, aun si morían solos, yo no quería dejarlos insepultos sin algún reconocimiento de quienes habían sido y del hecho que yo les había querido y de que Dios los había recibido en sus brazos”.Eso fue hace 10 años. Su ministerio ha evolucionado de tal manera que la oficina del médico forense le avisa cuando tienen un cadáver al que nadie reclama. El condado dona una tumba y las funerarias la localidad ofrecen sus servicios y un ataúd de cartón.Él despide el duelo de los muertos “y trato de personalizarlo”, contó Fender. “Yo sí siempre les aseguro a los que están reunidos allí que esa persona ya dejó de no tener hogar. Que esa persona ha encontrado un hogar. Nosotros somos los desamparados, pero que esa persona ya ha dejado de serlo”.Fender cree que una noche cualquiera “hay de 300 a 500 personas durmiendo a la intemperie”, dijo él. “Chattanooga tiene un albergue de emergencia, y tiene 42 camas para hombres y 12 para mujeres, de manera que un gran número de personas duerme a la intemperie”.‘Vigilia’ sagrada en Los ÁngelesEn Los Ángeles, la triple colaboración de la Rda. Sarah Nichols, del Prof. Don Gabard, de la Universidad de Chapman y de la Dra. Pamlyn Close, ha preparado a casi 100 voluntarios para el programa A Tu Lado [By Your Side], un programa concebido para “encontrar a las personas donde se encuentren y sirviendo de compañeros compasivos de los agonizantes”.Nichols, director de cuidado pastoral de Comunidades y Servicios Episcopales de la diócesis, dijo que los voluntarios ofrecen “el don de la auténtica presencia” a los que se encuentran en los hospitales, asilos de ancianos, instalaciones de atención sanitaria a largo plazo, sus propias parroquias y comunidades de influencia.“La investigación revela que la compañía y el apoyo espiritual son dos de los deseos más importantes al final de la vida, y no obstante muchos norteamericanos mueren solos”, dijo Nichols en un correo electrónico a Episcopal News Service.“Al enfrentarse a la vulnerabilidad del fin de la vida, todo ser humano merece que le afirmen la santidad [de su persona] y que le reconozcan su espiritualidad mediante la presencia compasiva de otra persona, de cualquier modo que le resulte significativo”, añadió.No se trata de hacer proselitismo ni incluso de orar, dice Don Gabard, fisioterapeuta y párroco de la iglesia de Todos los Santos [All Saints] en Pasadena, a quien la muerte de su madre y el servicio voluntario lo ayudaron a inspirar A Tu Lado.Hace seis años su madre se estaba muriendo de un cáncer ovárico en Carolina del Norte y “ella me hizo saber claramente que quería que yo estuviera allí”, recordaba él en una reciente entrevista telefónica con ENS. “Yo me sentía muy entristecido por su muerte, pero al mismo tiempo muy agradecido de poder estar allí”.Él también ha hecho trabajo voluntario en el centro médico de la Universidad del Sur de California en el condado de Los Ángeles, donde por lo menos el siete por ciento de los pacientes son personas sin hogar y nunca tienen quien los visite.Lo que muchas personas realmente quieren “es contar su historia”, agregó. “Pueden contártela muchas veces pero cambia porque lo que están haciendo es encontrándole un sentido a la vida”.Así que “no existe ninguna fórmula para esto. Las personas tienen su manera única de darle sentido o de encontrarle sentido [a la vida] en su fe, si tienen fe”.Gabard recordaba la visita a una niña de siete años. “Sus familiares la abandonaron cuando descubrieron que tenía una enfermedad catastrófica que iba a quitarle la vida”.“No podían resistir estar allí. Lo que hicimos como voluntarios fue sostenerla y cantarle y consolarla como uno hace con cualquier niño. Si hay derechos que son inalienables, el de ser sostenido y amado como niño es ciertamente uno de ellos”.Los voluntarios visitan a los que  se encuentran desatendidos por su familia, no tienen familia, o son muy jóvenes o  tienen más de 80 años. De todo tipo. No puedo predecir quién o qué voy a ver cuando vaya allí”.Durante dos años como voluntaria de A Tu Lado, Sharon Crandall, feligresa de la iglesia de Nuestro Salvador [Our Saviour] en San Gabriel, California,  [el ministerio] de visitar a los moribundos “ha sido mucho más gratificante y transformador de lo que yo nunca habría imaginado”.“He aprendido que el mejor enfoque es no tener ninguna expectativa. Aprender a conocer a personas cuando se encuentran en el proceso de morir me ha ayudado en mis relaciones con los demás y en mi relación con Dios”, afirmó.“También me dio el valor y la compasión para cuidar a mi tía en sus últimas semanas y a mi suegra en sus últimos meses. Ambas tenían el deseo de morir en su casa. Fue tan gratificante poder compartir este tiempo con ellas dos. Es un don que uno realmente tiene que experimentar, la gracia de la agonía”.Esperanza y ángeles en DetroitA las 4 P.M. el tercer miércoles de cada mes, Carolyn Gamble, guardiana mayor de la iglesia episcopal de San Cristóbal-San Pablo [St. Christopher’s-St. Paul’s] en Detroit se reúne, junto con Kaitlyn, su nieta de 13 años y otras personas, en la Funeraria Perry.Ellos encienden una vela, leen los nombres de los muertos que nadie ha reclamado en la ciudad, oran y cantan.Al igual que Gabard en Los Ángeles, la participación de Gamble partió de la experiencia personal. Su madre había vivido tanto en Nueva York como en Detroit y “cuando ella murió le celebraron servicios religiosos en ambos lugares”, explicó Gamble durante una entrevista telefónica el 29 de octubre.Cuando otra feligresa le habló de los fallecidos en la ciudad que nadie reclamaba en la morgue, “de la manera en que disponían de sus cadáveres, sin oficio religioso ni nada, realmente me impacto”, contó ella. “Me resultó extraño, sentí que alguien debía hacer algo”.La funeraria facilita el espacio y los nombres de aquellos a quien nadie reclama. La iglesia ha ofrecido servicios no denominacionales desde 2008, según la Rda. Deborah-Semon Scott, rectora de San Cristóbal-San Pablo. En ese tiempo, “he perdido la cuenta de a cuantas personas les hemos celebrado un culto”, dijo, “Anda en los miles”.Ella ha oficiado por igual en entierros para bebés que para personas centenarias. Usualmente no hay cenizas ni cuerpos presentes. En su lugar, se enciende una vela y hay una sola rosa de tallo largo que lleva una tarjeta con el nombre y la fecha de nacimiento y muerte de la persona, si se conoce, por cada individuo que se recuerda. En varios oficios, ha habido un mínimo de 30 velas y rosas o un máximo de 60, agregó.“Podrían haber estado en un asilo; a veces tenemos oficios por bebés que se malograron o que murieron al nacer o nacieron muertos”, según cuenta Semon-Scott. “Y también hemos tenido servicios para individuos de quienes se encontraron los restos y tienen como fecha de muerte el día en que los encontraron. Todo lo que pueden hacer es decir que fueron hombres o mujeres y en ocasiones ese dato es bastante impreciso. Suena macabro, pero es un hecho real”.El ministerio comenzó después que un ex feligrés oyó una transmisión radial  de que Detroit y otras grandes ciudades  tenían acumulación de cadáveres no reclamados. “Él pensó lo triste que era que alguien viniera a esta vida y fuera parte de este reino por cualquier extensión de tiempo y partiera como si nunca hubiera estado, y no pudiera hacerse algo al respecto”, contó ella.Después de las oraciones, hay himnos, “algo que todo el mundo se sepa, como “Mantennos unidos, Señor” [Bind us together, Lord].“Estos son seres humanos creados a imagen del creador y toda vida es sagrada, cualquiera sea el tiempo que nos ha sido dado: la buena, la mala y la fea. Debe ser celebrada, reconocida y agradecida porque ellos anduvieron sobre la tierra”, afirmó. “Entrar en la noche como si nunca hubieras existido es muy triste”.Aunque el ministerio “ha tocado profundamente las vidas de las personas que han sido parte de él”, los voluntarios son pocos, tal vez porque es malentendido.“Creíamos que haríamos esto una o dos veces al año”, recordaba Gamble. “Creíamos que [la idea] cuajaría y que otros querrían hacerlo también. Pero no cuajó. No hemos encontrado gente que se interese”.Semon-Scott estuvo de acuerdo. “Cuando reivindico esto como uno de nuestros ministerios comunitarios, como una misión de la Iglesia, usualmente la respuesta de otros clérigos es ‘oh, tiene que ser horrible ir y hacer eso’”.Paradójicamente, es cualquier cosa menos eso, dijo Semon-Scott. “¿Cómo podría algo que uno supondría que es lúgubre conllevar una paz jubilosa? Y sin embargo, así es. Subrayó ella. “Uno puede marcharse y saber que hacerlo fue algo bueno y justo”.Volviendo a Chattanooga, Fender dijo que él había dado sepultura a 26 personas el año pasado. “Este año, hasta el momento, han sido sólo 12, gracias a Dios”.El ministerio es importante “porque la conexión entre nosotros y los que han muerto sigue siendo muy fuerte”, agregó. “Pienso que estamos conectados eternamente a través de Dios y cuando visito el cementerio y esas tumbas sé que esa persona está presente allí conmigo. La muerte puede ponerle fin a una vida terrena, pero no le pone fin a un ser.“Somos seres espirituales con una experiencia humana terrenal y nuestra conexión con ellos es muy fuerte. Creo que mientras los recordemos sabemos que nos devuelven la mirada con amor y acción de gracias. Siempre les digo a mis amigos desamparados cuando visito sus tumbas que los veré de nuevo algún día”.–La Rda. Pat McCaughan es corresponsal de Episcopal News Service y está radicada en Los Ángeles. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY Submit a Press Release Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI center_img Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA ‘Acompañantes’ en ambos lados de la tumba TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH last_img read more

Details