PREMIERE: Brooklyn’s The Saturators Release Bangin’ New Single, “Not For You” [Studio/Live Video]

first_img[Photo:  Tucker W Mitchell] The Saturators are a Brooklyn/Harlem-based dance band that melds an astounding amount of genres to produce their own authentic and wholly unique sound. The group is made up of guitarist and producer Misha “Silky” Savage (Marc Cary’s Harlem Sessions, PitchBlak family), MC Redddaz (Brittany Campbell, Jadon), musical director and bassist Aiman Radzi, and percussionist Theo Moore, though frequently taps additional musicians for live collaborations including Matt Compo (keys), Colin Taylor (drums), Jennifer Nasciemento (vocals and percussion), Will Sacks (production and bass), Doron Lev (drums), and Angel Acevedo (drums and percussion). Dubbed “wet music,” the Saturators pull on Harlem’s vibrant hip-hop scene and Brooklyn’s underground basement parties and mixes it with tastes of Dancehall, Sosa, Cumbia, and 70’s funk to create their danceable and upbeat tunes that are guaranteed to get bodies moving on the floor.The Saturators have a new album in the works, appropriately dubbed Wet Music, which is due out in June. Ahead of its release, the band has been kind enough to share with us their latest single, a swinging number called “Not For You” featuring Black Tie Brass on horns. Misha Savage describes the song as “a romp through the eyes of a boozed-up bar patron” with “the band narrating the endgame of someone who’s too trusting of liquid confidence.” With clear afrobeat aspirations, this latest song from The Saturators is definitely one that you’ll want to hear, particularly because of the track’s a compelling lyrical narrative and its grinding yet playful musical base.Live For Live Music is proud to present the premiere of the studio recording of The Saturators’ “Not For You” in addition to the official Sofar Sounds video of the group performing the number live. Check out the studio version and the live version of “Not For You” below, then head over to the band’s website here for more information about this fiery group of performers!last_img read more

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Service in any language

first_img Harvard Ed Portal program offers fun, skill-building activities for local students Summer explorers Related Program for incoming first-years offers an opportunity to sample public service Since his first Latin class in seventh grade, Ben Elwy ’23 has used language to learn about the world around him.In addition to his native English and Latin, he knows ancient Greek, modern Arabic, and German, which he learned in school, through extracurricular programs, and at summer camps. He has collected 11 dictionaries, including volumes in Norwegian, Japanese, and Maori, through his own travels and those of his family and friends, who always know what to get him as a souvenir.“I love seeing all the patterns in a language and what they mean,” he said. “For example, the English word ‘door’ is related to the Latin word ‘forum,’ the ancient Greek word ‘thur,’ the German word ‘tür,’ and the Hindi word ‘dvar,’ all of which have to do with doors or passages. Those languages are spread out across continents and time, but they’re connected in the origins of their words. I think that’s amazing.”center_img This summer, Elwy made use of his passion for language in his hometown of Wellesley through a project with Harvard’s Service Starts with Summer Program, a new initiative for a select number of  incoming first-year students. As part of the College’s commitment to encouraging public service the entire class will participate Thursday in the annual Day of Service in which students will do volunteer work at locations around Greater Boston.For his program venture, Elwy committed 80 volunteer hours to designing and teaching a program called Arabic and Cultural Education. The program ran for an hour every day for two weeks in late July and early August at the Wellesley Free Library, with the first week designed for third to fifth graders and the second for sixth to eighth graders.,“In general, I noticed, at least in my community, that there aren’t that many opportunities to learn Arabic, which is why I focused on that for my project,” said Elwy, adding that it was a language that seems particularly relevant right now and one that many are curious about. “My program is about language you could go and use right away if you were in an Arabic-speaking country.”Each day focused on a theme, including a day at the market, a typical school day, or the geography of the Arab world. Elwy based the curriculum on his experiences during two summers in the Arabic Summer Academy in Charlestown. In that program and in Elwy’s, language and culture go hand in hand. Elwy’s family has roots in India, Egypt, Germany, and the U.S., and his multicultural upbringing contributed to his interest in making connections across cultures.“Just learning how people introduce themselves in an Arabic-speaking country is an example of what that culture is like,” said Elwy, referring to how much residents appreciate attempts by visitors to learn even simple greetings in their language. “When I learn languages, it’s an opportunity to learn more about culture and how people live in other parts of the world.”“When Ben approached me, I was happy to help him, because I knew that he was very organized, had good follow-through, and seemed very committed to what he was doing,” said Emma Weiler, the library’s Children’s Department supervisor who oversaw Elwy’s project. “The library is a special place for this kind of program, because we are a community gathering place that tries to be inclusive of everyone. I thought Ben’s idea of teaching Arabic and getting people to understand each other a little more would go a long way.”Elwy had never taught before developing his program, but he was no stranger to the world of community service. In 2016, he began volunteering through The Congressional Award, a personal-growth program for American youth run by Congress, with four areas of focus, one of which is service.Throughout high school, he volunteered at organizations across Greater Boston, including the Red Cross Food Pantry and Cradles to Crayons. In 2017, he and his older sister, Lucy, received the U.S. President’s Volunteer Service Award in recognition of their contributions.,For Elwy, the biggest challenges, besides his lack of teaching experience, involved his insecurities about his ability to take on the administrative, educational, and community-outreach components of the program. Looking back, he is proud of his choice to step outside his comfort zone.“Something that I like about service is the opportunity to help other people, specifically for me because I have a physical disability,” said Elwy, who has Schwartz-Jampel syndrome, a rare neuromuscular genetic condition that can affect bone development and muscle flexibility. “I also appreciate being able to see what I myself can do, and that’s something that service lets me experience and show others.”Based on his experience this summer, Elwy is working with the Classical and Modern Languages Department at his alma mater, Wellesley High School, to create a program for student volunteers to develop and teach their own language and culture classes for elementary schoolers. As he steps onto campus for his first year at Harvard, Elwy is looking forward to bringing his skills and experience to a new and globally focused community.“This program was an opportunity to figure out how I can use what I have to help people as much as possible,” said Elwy. “I hope to continue using my interests, as they develop, to do community outreach and help people understand each other.”Participants in the Service Starts with Summer Program commit to contributing at least 100 hours to a service project in their hometowns over the summer, with 80 hours spent on direct service and 20 spent in professional-development settings including cohort meetings, webinars, and a day of service on campus. Most program participants work in unpaid positions and are eligible to receive a $1,500 stipend through the program. A summer of helping Relatedlast_img read more

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Alumnae from Institute of Health lectures on H1N1 virus

first_imgDr. Mary Anne Luzar, a 1972 College graduate, was back on the Saint Mary’s campus Tuesday night to speak about the H1N1 pandemic. Luzar works for the National Institute of Health as Chief of the Regulatory Affairs Branch in the Division of AIDS at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.“We have to look at what we can learn from pandemics, and that’s why I wanted to speak tonight,” Luzar said.Luzar opened her presentation by defining the differences between an epidemic and a pandemic and making sure there was a clear understanding between the two.“An epidemic is a disease that occurs with greater frequency than expected,” Luzar said. “Some examples are the Bird Flu and SARS. A pandemic is an epidemic that spreads all over the world or a major region of the world. These include AIDS, TB, Malaria, Spanish flu, and the ‘black death’ of the 14th century,” Luzar said.Luzar made a point to explain that there have been many pandemics and epidemics in the past, and humans are knowledgeable about these events.“Over the past 300 years there have been 11 influenza pandemics. The Spanish Influenza in 1918 is the most fatal event in world history with 20-50 million deaths,” Luzar said.Luzar said pandemics are sudden disease outbreaks that are unpredictable and can also occur at any time in the year.“That is just something we have to deal with and prepare for,” Luzar said. “But once a pandemic appears it does not just go away. It will continue for years, which is why we need to pay attention to H1N1.”Luzar also said the H1N1 virus is a distant cousin of the 1918 Spanish Influenza but is still an entirely new virus.“Symptoms of H1N1 are similar to the flu but with additional symptoms like diarrhea,” Luzar said. “It spreads through respiratory droplets, coughs and sneezes, touching objects touched by an infectious person, then touching your nose and mouth.”H1N1 has affected many people around the world. Children and young adults are amongst those most affected.“Two hundred-thirty countries had cases of H1N1 and today there have been around 20,000 deaths due to H1N1,” Luzar said.The H1N1 response was considered a success because of rapid worldwide communications, and the vaccine was approved quickly and given to priority groups first, Luzar said.“It is very hard to know if you are successful in these endeavors. I’m proud of what we did. I think we did the right thing. And not doing anything would have been unacceptable,” Luzar said. “This pandemic taught us that we are not immune to them because we are in the 21st century. Virus and disease are always just one step ahead of us. This was a dress rehearsal of what could happen in the future so we need to be prepared.”This event was co-sponsored by College Relations and the Career Crossings Office.last_img read more

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On the Town’s Alysha Umphress Is Broadway.com’s Newest Vlogger!

first_img View Comments On the Town Related Shows Not only can she cook…she can vlog, too! Alysha Umphress is grabbing a camera and taking us behind of the scenes of On the Town. Look out for her video blog series, Taxicab Confessions: Backstage at On the Town with Alysha Umphress, to kick off on October 14. Umphress will take us backstage and show us what makes On the Town such a helluva show. Expect appearences by three men who look mighty fine in uniform: Clyde Alves, Jay Armstrong Johnson and Tony Yazbeck, and maybe, just maybe, former Broadway.com vlogger Jackie Hoffman.center_img Taxicab Confessions will run every Tuesday for eight weeks. On the Town opens at the Lyric Theatre on October 16 In addition to playing taxi driver Hildy in On the Town, Umphress has appeared on Broadway in Bring It On, On a Clear Day You Can See Forever, Priscilla Queen of the Desert and American Idiot. Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 6, 2015last_img read more

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Koehler-Ayers Professor

first_imgUniversity of Georgia food scientist Yen-Con Hung has been named the first recipient of the Koehler-Ayers Professorship.The Koehler-Ayers Professorship was recently established through a donation to the UGA Foundation from UGA food science alumnus Balasubramanian Swaminathan and his wife Mangal Swaminathan. The professorship in food science at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) is named in honor of Swami’s mentors, UGA food scientists Philip Koehler and John Ayers.The Koehler-Ayers Professorship is designated for a UGA faculty member with an outstanding record in externally funded research and/or scholarly publications who is engaged in teaching, research, public service or a combination of such duties.“Dr. Hung is one of our top scientists in the Department of Food Science and Technology, based in Griffin,” said Allen Moore, associate dean for research at CAES. “He has a stellar international reputation and is in demand to share his expertise across the globe. The awarding of a named professorship provides recognition for his contributions and value to UGA and food safety.”A professor in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Hung has an innovative research program in developing and applying advanced processing techniques to solve food safety and quality problems.In 1997, he began studying the use of electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water as a means of disinfecting without the use of harmful chemicals. He developed technology to apply EO water to ensure the safety of many food products including meat, poultry and fresh produce. This technology can also reduce bacterial contamination and disinfect food contact surfaces, a compelling contribution to the food service and food manufacturing industries.Hung’s commitment to international outreach and collaboration has helped to build safer food systems around the world. This work earned him UGA’s D.W. Brooks Award for Excellence in Global Programs in 2018 and the Bor S. Luh International Award from the Institute of Food Technologists in 2020. He received the UGA Creative Research Medallion in 2002 and the D.W. Brooks Award for Excellence in Research in 2011.“Dr. Hung is truly a world-class scientist who has distinguished himself in research, outreach and teaching, and has been recognized by his peers,” said Rakesh Singh, head of the UGA Department of Food Science and Technology. “He is an inspiration to his graduate students, postdocs and junior faculty.”Balasubramanian Swami began his food science career as a chemist for the Coca-Cola Company. After earning master’s and doctoral degrees in food science at CAES, he joined the faculty of the foods and nutrition department at Purdue University. He remained there for eight years until accepting a position with the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention (CDC).After completing 20 years with the CDC, Balasubramanian Swami retired as senior advisor for laboratory science for the Division of Bacterial and Mycotic Diseases in 2006. His wife Mangal Swami retired in 2007 after a career in health information technology at HBO and Company and later at McKesson Corporation, which acquired HBO and Company.Since their retirement, the couple has established IHRC Inc., an organization dedicated to providing scientific program support for federal public health agencies. In 2015, IHRC established the Applied Bioinformatics Laboratory in collaboration with the Georgia Institute of Technology to provide state-of-the-art bioinformatics training and custom bioinformatic analysis support to the private and public sectors. In 2016, IHRC established IHRC Kenya to provide public health support in Kenya and other African countries.For more information about the UGA Department of Food Science and Technology, visit foodscience.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

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Wrangling with risk-based capital

first_img 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr It’s time for a more rational approach to managing risk.by: James CollinsLast Thanksgiving—for the first time ever—my wife attempted to make a Tofurky. The commentary from the kitchen was, as we say, rather illuminating:“Wait, which one is the tofu? Wait, that’s the gravy?”“Why is the cat circling my feet and why do I smell canned cat food?”“No microwave instructions????”“Would it be bad if I added chicken stock to it?” (Answer is no, chicken stock is like donated plasma from chickens).Tofurky is just like other misnamed foods such as “Spaghetti squash” (which is as far from spaghetti as Lindsey Lohan is from being an actress) and Kale (which looks, feels, and reminds you of lettuce but tastes like something your mother would mend denim jeans with).And that brings us to something else that isn’t what it seems: NCUA’s Risk Based Capital proposal.Since the first attempt to establish the rule had a “little bit of pushback,” per NCUA—which is a bit like saying “the defensive front line of the Arizona Cardinals strongly recommends that the opposing running back not advance”—the plan is to try again.On its surface, NCUA has a daunting task. It must encapsulate all of the following risks into a simple, easy-to-understand ratio: continue reading »last_img read more

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Washington anthrax alarms appear false

first_imgMar 16, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – The anthrax alert that shut down several government buildings in the Washington, DC, area this week and put hundreds of workers on preventive antibiotic treatment apparently was a false alarm. Testing of more than 70 samples from a mail facility near the Pentagon in Arlington, Va., and a mailroom at an office complex in nearby Falls Church, Va., showed no trace of anthrax, the Washington Post reported today. This week’s episode sparked some complaints of lack of communication and coordination between government agencies. Virginia and Fairfax County officials were angry that DoD didn’t alert them immediately about the anthrax alert at the Pentagon facility, according to the Post. Also, the story said, a Bush administration official voiced concern that the Department of Homeland Security had not been alerted. The Post report said DoD officials had recommended that nearly 700 DoD workers take preventive antibiotics. Federal and local health officials recommended that they continue taking them until final test results are in, the story said. The post office, on V Street Northeast, was to reopen at noon today, the Post reported. Postal Service spokesman Gerry McKiernan said workers at the site who had started taking antibiotics were being told they could discontinue them. The episode began the morning of Mar 14, when a military contractor that handles biohazard monitoring at the Pentagon mail facility reported evidence of anthrax on a filter that had been sampled Mar 10. The mail facility was closed, and 263 workers there provided nasal swab samples for testing. Winkenwerder said the negative follow-up test results in the current episode contrasted sharply with what happened in 2001, according to the AFPS report. At that time, “There were multiple positive tests from the environment, sort of all over the place,” he said. “We don’t have any of that at this time, despite a lot of testing.” A sensor in a mailroom at the Skyline Five Place sounded an alarm at 2:30 p.m. the same day. Emergency crews were called, and about 800 workers in three connected buildings were confined there for 6 hours. The Pentagon sample that tested positive in the contractor’s lab was subsequently retested by the US Army Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) in Maryland. There, a polymerase chain reaction test confirmed the positive finding early yesterday morning. But subsequent culturing of samples to detect live bacteria yielded only negative findings, the Post reported today. This week’s alert had prompted the government to close a Washington post office that processes mail for the DoD and other government agencies and to recommend antibiotic treatment for about 200 workers there. Mail delivered to that facility is also irradiated before it gets there.center_img An unnamed military official told the Post and the New York Times that contamination in a military contractor’s laboratory in Richmond, Va., might have triggered the initial finding of anthrax on a filter from the Pentagon mail facility on Mar 14. There was no indication in today’s reports what might have caused the anthrax alert later the same day in a Department of Defense (DoD) mailroom at the Falls Church complex, called Baileys Crossroads Skyline. Fairfax County officials announced this afternoon that the complex would reopen tomorrow, but that one suite would remain closed pending further test results. The military official quoted anonymously by the Times said the original anthrax finding in the contractor’s lab appeared to be related to quality control problems. He said labs that test for anthrax normally keep a sample of anthrax on hand to calibrate equipment. Evidence suggested, he said, that this sample had somehow contaminated the sample from the filter at the Pentagon mail facility. The same contaminated sample then was tested by USAMRIID, he said. DoD officials said they had found no link between the alerts at the Pentagon facility and the Skyline Five complex, according to the Post. Officials have said there was little chance of live anthrax spores contaminating either building via mail deliveries, because all mail to both facilities is irradiated before it arrives. Routine irradiation to kill pathogens was begun as a result of the mail-borne anthrax releases of October 2001, which killed five people and sickened 17 others. See also: DoD’s top health officer, Dr. William J. Winkenwerder, said authorities didn’t find any mail that could have triggered detection equipment, according to a report by DoD’s American Forces Press Service (AFPS). Nor did the government receive any threats, the Post said. Mar 16 Fairfax County statementhttp://www.co.fairfax.va.us/news/2005/05086.htmlast_img read more

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South Korea declares new ‘special care zone’ as coronavirus spreads

first_imgDozens of newly commissioned military nurses were due to begin work in Daegu on Thursday, the health ministry said.The Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported three more deaths from the virus, bringing the total in the country to 35.NEW US CASESUS Forces Korea (USFK) reported two new cases, for a total of six cases in soldiers, employees or people related to the roughly 28,500 troops stationed in South Korea.Despite the new cases, USFK had resumed sending troops to bases in Daegu and surrounding areas, according to military newspaper Stars and Stripes.Commanders believed the bases were protected from the outside population, and that the troop rotations were needed to maintain readiness in the face of continued threats from nuclear-armed North Korea, the newspaper reported.Australia’s move to ban the arrival of foreigners from South Korea is a blow to Seoul’s efforts to prevent the United States from imposing such restrictions.South Korean officials met the US ambassador in Seoul on Wednesday to urge the United States not to limit travel.According to the US State Department, anyone with a fever of 100.4 F (38 C) is already banned from boarding direct flights from South Korea to the United States.Korean Air Lines said on Thursday it would screen all passengers departing Incheon airport for high temperatures and reject those deemed a risk.South Korea sent three “rapid response” teams to Vietnam on Thursday to assist more than 270 citizens quarantined in that country over coronavirus concerns, the foreign ministry said.Topics : Gyeongsan has seen a spike in new cases, including at a nursing home. Similar zones have been declared around neighbouring Daegu city and Cheongdo County.Around 75% of all cases in South Korea are in and around Daegu, the country’s fourth-largest city, where the flu-like virus that emerged from China late last year has spread rapidly through members of a religious group.”Everyday is sad and tough like a war. But our Daegu citizens are showing surprise wisdom and courage,” Daegu Mayor Kwon Young-jin told reporters on Thursday.Officials said hospitals in the hardest hit areas were struggling to accommodate new patients. Daegu city officials said 2,117 patients were waiting for rooms in the city. South Korea declared a “special care zone” on Thursday around a second city hit hard by the coronavirus and the US military confirmed two new cases among relatives of its troops in the country, which is battling the biggest epidemic outside China.Australia became the latest country to impose travel restrictions on South Koreans, with almost 100 nations now limiting arrivals from the East Asian country which reported 438 new coronavirus cases on Thursday for a total of 5,766.The South Korean government declared a “special care zone” around Gyeongsan, a city of about 275,000 people 250 kms (150 miles) southeast of Seoul, promising extra resources such as face masks and warning people from travelling there.last_img read more

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Nuclear pension plan hones in on £40m bulk annuity

first_imgThe UK’s multi-employer pension plan for the nuclear decommissioning sector is looking to secure a bulk annuity for its GPS EnergySolutions section.The defined benefit section is one of the smallest in the Combined Nuclear Pension Plan (CMPP), with no active members. As at the end of March 2018 there were three deferred members, and nine pensioners. Liabilities were valued at £40.3m (€45.9m), and the scheme had a deficit of £8.9m.In an EU procurement notice, CMPP, which has £2.5bn of assets across all its sections, said the bulk annuity contract “should be capable of being quickly converted to a ‘buyout’ without seeking residual data risk cover or a need for further data cleanse work”.In an August newsletter, the pension fund indicated that it expected the GPS Energy Solutions section to be wound up “within the year”. In the tender notice it said it might seek further insurance deals for other sections in future. In the trustee’s report for the year ended 31 March 2018 it had said that – with the exception of the GPS EnergySolutions section – there were no current plans to discontinue CMPP and strike a buyout deal, but it had considered the level of funding relative to the estimated costs of such a transaction.In April 2016 ATK Energy EU, the GPS EnergySolutions section’s employer, was sold to WS Atkins. EnergySolutions, the former parent company of the employer, agreed to an insurance buyout for the section’s liabilities so WS Atkins would not have any related pension costs.EnergySolutions placed $7.7m (€6.2m) into an escrow account to facilitate the buyout. Another $16m was placed into a separate escrow account “to cover the obligations of the seller”, including any amount in excess of the original $7.7m.CMPP’s bulk annuity tender closes on 17 April.Separately, the pension fund also announced it had selected Aegon as a “bundled” provider for its defined contribution sections, covering administration and investment.Last year was a record-breaking year for the pension transfer market. According to Aon, more than £35bn of business was written, with pension schemes entering into more than £24bn of deals, double 2017 volumes. British Airways, Nortel, Rentokil and Siemens all completed annuity deals of more than £1bn during the year.Advisers largely expect 2019 to be another strong year for the de-risking market.last_img read more

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Maine: Notaries must perform same-sex ‘marriages’

first_imgLifesite News 14 Dec 2012In the state of Maine, any notary public who performs marriages may not refuse to perform a same-sex “marriage” for any reason, upon pain of being charged with a human rights violation, according to Maine’s secretary of state. After legalizing same-sex “marriage” in November, Maine in now notifying notaries public who wed heterosexual couples they must provide the same services to homosexuals as of December 29. Secretary of State Charles Summers Jr. made the comment in response to an e-mail query. There are approximately 25,000 notaries public in the state, licensed by the bureau of corporations, elections , and commissions. They may choose not to perform weddings, but they may not wed only heterosexuals, regardless of their religious objections. Under Maine’s human rights ordinance, refusal is considered a human rights violation. This does not violate their religious liberty, according to David Farmer, the spokesman for Mainers United for Marriage, the organization that led efforts to pass the referendum. “They are required to perform their duties as actors of the state,” Farmer told the Bangor Daily News.  “They can decide to not do weddings for any reason.”http://www.lifesitenews.com/news/maine-notaries-must-perform-same-sex-marriages-or-violate-human-rights-lawlast_img read more

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