Suffolk Dems Maintain Legislative Majority

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Suffolk Democratic Chairman Rich Schaffer addresses supporters in Hauppauge on Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2013.Suffolk County Democrats lost one key seat in their legislative majority but made up for it by unseating a renegade member who didn’t caucus with the party and recapturing another open seat.The unofficial election results of Tuesday’s election appear to ensure that Steve Bellone, in his sophomore year as Suffolk County executive, can still rely on the chamber led by Democratic allies despite the slight turnover.“We’ve done a lot in two years,” Bellone told a crowd of several hundred cheering supporters at the IBEW Local 25 Hall in Hauppauge. “But you haven’t seen anything yet!”The two biggest legislative upsets came when Republican Kevin McCaffrey, a Lindenhurst village trustee, won the seat held by outgoing temporary Presiding Officer Wayne Horsley (D-Babylon) and when political newcomer Monica Martinez unseated fellow Democrat Legis. Rick Montano (D-Central Islip).“Right now the county executive has a veto-proof majority in there and people don’t like that,” McCaffrey told the Press at the Suffolk GOP gathering in Patchogue. “They want to be able to have some sort of balance in the legislature.”There were a few nail-biters, including when Legis. Sarah Anker (D-Mt. Sinai) narrowly fended off GOP challenger Jennifer Juengst 52 to 48 percent, the same margin that William Lindsay Jr., son of the late presiding officer, beat Republican Anthony Musumeci.But, the political makeup of the 18-member body will mostly remain the same as Republican Robert Trotta won the seat held by term-limited Legis. Lynne Nowick (R-St. James), keeping it away from Democrat Elaine Turley.Democratic incumbents who held off Republicans include freshman Legis. Al Krupski (D-Cutchogue), Legis. Kara Hahn (D-Setauket), Legis. Robert Calarco (D-Patchogue), Legis. Dr. William Spencer (D-Centerport), Legis. Lou D’Amaro (D-Huntington Station) and Majority Leader DuWayne Gregory (D-Amityville). Legis. Steve Stern (D-Dix Hills) ran unopposed.Republican lawmakers who resisted Democrats include Legis. Tom Muatore (R-Ronkonkoma) and Minority Leader John M. Kennedy Jr. (R-Nesconset). Legis. Tom Cilmi (R-East Islip) and Legis. Tom Barraga (R-West Islip) were both uncontested.Third-party incumbents Legis. Kate Browning (WF-Shirley) and Legis. Jay Schneiderman (I-Montauk) were also re-elected.Suffolk Democratic Chairman Rich Schaffer, who was re-elected Babylon Town Supervisor, credited the wins to Lindsay’s father, who died this summer.“We miss him dearly…he’s left us too soon,” Schaffer said. “But I know today he is with us. He is here and he is smiling down because the one thing he told me…was ‘Rich, don’t screw up Billy’s campaign.’”last_img read more

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This northern Brisbane has had stronger price growth than any other in the past quarter

first_imgSue and John Callan with their dog Buddy at the home which they are selling at Kurwongbah. Picture: Mark Cranitch.HOUSES appear to sell fairly fast in Kurwongbah and homeowners John and Sue Callan are hoping that will be the case for them.The couple have listed their four-bedroom home at 64 Pine Crest Drive for sale for $549,000 after buying it ten years ago.Mr Callan believed many people had the mistaken idea that Kurwongbah was not as close to Brisbane as it was. It was 28km from the CBD and close to major transport routes.Mrs Callan still travelled to Kangaroo Point for work a couple of days a week and it didn’t take that long and they were close to three train stations.“There is one subdivision in the whole of Kurwongbah virtually,’’ Mr Callan said.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach Northless than 1 hour agoNew apartments released at idyllic retirement community Samford Grove Presented by “Kurwongbah is a really big suburb and it is mostly acreage, but in this little estate, they are all about 700sq m or a little bit more. It is in the corner so that the railway is on one side, and Narangba Road is on the other and it can’t be built out.“Nobody really knows it is here, they are really nice people and it is a nice quiet suburb.’’Mr Callan said houses turned over pretty regularly and when they were on the market they didn’t last long.The home has a new pool, powered shed, solar power and is on a 700sq m block of land.Marketing agent Chris Pascoe, LJ Hooker – Kallangur/Murrumba Downs said within the area properties tended to sell fairly fast.“It is a bit of an unknown suburb, there is rural acreage property and some pockets of residential,’’ he said.“There is not a lot of homes in Kurwongbah and it is in an area there surrounded by Petrie and Narangba and it is close to the action.’’last_img read more

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Three Guyanese players in CWI Emerging Players Pool for CPL 2020

first_imgTHE Hero Caribbean Premier League (CPL) is continuing its commitment toward the development of the next generation of Caribbean cricketers with the Cricket West Indies (CWI) Emerging Player programme, which will see the best young talent across the region being guaranteed game time during this year’s tournament.These players have been selected by CWI and represent the best cricketers aged Under-23 across the region.Ashmead Nedd is one of the three Guyanese on the list, the others being all-rounder Kevin Sinclair and batsman Bhaskar Yadram.Each squad will have two of these players and each team must give a minimum of five games to an emerging player, either one player taking the field five times or a combination of appearances between the two players.The rules and regulations for the 2020 Hero CPL give each team the option to sign a player from the CWI Emerging Player Pool who is from his home territory ahead of the draft.The deadline for making these early signings has now passed and four teams have made the decision to sign one of these exciting young cricketers before the draft.Those that did not make one of these signings before the deadline will be given the opportunity to sign their remaining Emerging Players at the Hero CPL draft.The four players who have been selected are as follows:Barbados Tridents: Nyeem YoungGuyana Amazon Warriors: Kevin SinclairSt Lucia Zouks: Kimani MeliusTrinbago Knight Riders: Jayden SealesIn addition to the option to sign a home territory player the teams were also given the opportunity to retain any of their emerging players from last year.Two teams exercised this option. The players retained are as follows:St Kitts & Nevis Patriots: Dominic DrakesTrinbago Knight Riders: Amir JangooPete Russell, COO of Hero CPL, said: “There is so much cricketing talent across the Caribbean and we want to make sure that our tournament plays its part in creating the next generation of West Indies stars.“We were delighted with how well these young players did in 2019 and we are really excited to see this group of talented cricketers during the 2020 tournament. The sky is the limit for these young men, and we want to see them succeed at CPL and beyond.”There are still six available Emerging Player spots in Hero CPL teams for the 2020 tournament which takes place from August 19 to September 26. These will be filled at the draft.The players who are available to fill those spots are as follows:Player Home TerritoryAlick Athanaze – WindwardsJoshua Bishop – BarbadosLeniko Boucher* – BarbadosKeacy Carty – LeewardsRoland Cato* – WindwardsJoshua da Silva – TrinidadNicholas Kirton – BarbadosMikyle Louis – LeewardsKirk McKenzie – JamaicaAshmead Nedd – GuyanaJeavor Royal* – JamaicaKeagan Simmons* – TrinidadShamar Springer* – BarbadosBhaskar Yadram – Guyanalast_img read more

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House subcommittee starts cutting the budget

first_imgDownload AudioMore than five weeks into the legislative session, House Finance Subcommittees recommended the first cuts to the budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1st.They include nine point $8 million in cuts to education programs, as well as cutting all $2.7 million in state funding for public broadcasting.Representative Daniel Ortiz, (I-Ketchikan) said eliminating the $2 million  for a pre-kindergarten program is a mistake.“It’s about investing now, so that you don’t have higher costs later,” he said. “And it just makes good economic sense to do this. Yeah we get the two million dollar reduction but you know it’s going to be hard for anybody to chart the costs to the state later on down the road.”Other proposed cuts include eliminating state funding for rural schools and libraries to increase broadband internet access. As well as a state program to fund mentors for teachers, which is aimed at retaining new teachers in rural Alaska.Representative Lynn Gattis (R-Wasilla) said none of the cuts are easy, but they’re necessary. That’s because the state has a three-and-a-half-billion-dollar budget shortfall.“Let’s put it this way. There’s nobody sitting here and I suspect nobody in the audience that’s very comfortable with any of these cuts. That being said, given I think somebody said to me, they said, you’re making me make a choice the right arm or the left arm and unfortunate part is, which arm do you write with, is where we’re at in making these cuts.”Representative Sam Kito (D-Juneau) said the state should be looking for new revenue, like Governor Walker has proposed, before cutting programs that disproportionately benefit rural areas.“The libraries in many of these communities become the focal point in trying to maintain connections with the outside world to try and engage students with technology,” he said.For  Mike Hawker, an Anchorage Republican, the debated education cuts are a small fraction of the overall cuts that are needed to close the state’s budget gap. He contends that the state expanded programs during oil boom years that it can no longer afford.“The decisions that I want to see coming out of this Legislature are the difficult decisions to reduce our spending to a level that is sustainable and, Ma’am, to do that there is no question that we are going to have to be reducing programs in areas across the state that are good that are desirable that people want but that respectfully we just can’t afford these days.Representative Neal Foster, a Democrat from Nome, said he hopes, before the budget is completed, the effect of cuts are geographically balanced. “I agree that cuts have to be made. I guess I was just – I’m sad to see that so many of these cuts are being made out of rural Alaskan programs. And so, um, I know it’s the beginning of the process, so I’m hopeful.”Subcommittees are completing their work on the budget over the next week.last_img read more

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